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  • Quads or back thickness

    Hi,

    I have lower back issues that cause me pain when I deadlift, but I can use the Trap Bar. However, sometimes this seems to work the quads extra-hard, too. I wondered if the Trap Bar DL can be regarded as a back thickness move, or is it a little too much "quad"?

    Thanks for any advice,
    D-Ap

  • #2
    I would think it's more back thickness and I could only imagine trying to progress on a widowmaker of 20 reps of it

    Can u do rack pulls? (Elevated deadlifts)

    There is some guys here I'm sure would help you find some too moves to use if you post up what your thinking for quads hams and back thickness
    I see you didn't take a s#!t before deadlifting....
    I too like to live dangerously

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    • #3
      Hi,

      Thanks for replying. I hit 15 reps now on the Trap Bar, and it is hard going. But useful to know it works for back thickness, thanks; I'll slot it into "back thickness".

      I've not done rack pulls in a couple of years. Last time I did them, I felt a tweak in my back when I went heavy. I get the same twinge with barbell rows.

      What I can do are dumbell prone rows, where you lean forward on an incline bench, pulling two dumbells upwards in a rowing motion; no pressure on the back.

      If the gym had a T-bar row machine - where you're leaning on the pad - that would be OK. I could do Hammer Rows, but I'm not sure if they're as effective as barbell rows, deadlifts, or rack pulls, of course.

      The "back thickness" moves I could incorporate are trap-bar deadlifts, DB prone rows, Hammer Rows, and a cable row.

      Thanks again,
      D-Ap

      Comment


      • #4
        Awesome
        I'd pick 2 rows I enjoyed and the trap bar if it was me :-)

        How does your leg training look

        (I also have to be very careful with my selection injuries)
        I see you didn't take a s#!t before deadlifting....
        I too like to live dangerously

        Comment


        • #5
          I love the trap bar. I flip mine over so that I am lifting with my hands level with the bar when I want to use more Quads (this does use a fair amount of lower back). For more back I use the higher handle grips.

          I do these as a set of 30 as a widowmaker style at the end of my workout and use the 30 reps as a sort of pump for my quads also.

          If you have lower back problems have you tried things like low ring rows or low rack rows as an exercise?

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...&v=Waj0jV1GoqQ

          When you get good you just add a backpack worn in reverse and weight it up.

          My current workout has weighted ring rows as my back thickness followed by trap bar as my widowmaker. - Life is good.
          "Be gentle in what you do, firm in how you do it."
          Buck Brannaman.

          "It is the certainty of punishment that deters crime, not the severity of it."
          'Hanging' Judge PARKER

          "Nothing is so powerful as an insight into human nature... what compulsions drive a man, what instincts dominate his action... if you know these things about a man you can touch him at the core of his being."
          ~William Bernbach

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          • #6
            Originally posted by D-Ap View Post
            Hi,

            I have lower back issues that cause me pain when I deadlift, but I can use the Trap Bar. However, sometimes this seems to work the quads extra-hard, too. I wondered if the Trap Bar DL can be regarded as a back thickness move, or is it a little too much "quad"?

            Thanks for any advice,
            D-Ap
            Where the exercise fits in your program depends on where you feel it / what musculature is (predominantly) activated.

            What if that exercise were called a trap bar arms-extended squat?... LOL

            -S
            The Book Has Arrived!
            The Book Has Arrived!

            Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a pristine, well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, used up, worn out, and shouting, "Holy #$&^%$^... What a ride!!!"


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            2012 NPC Master's Nationals HW 5th. Mid-USA HW & Overall
            2010 NPC Jr. USA HW 4th, Pacific USA Heavy 2nd
            2009 NPC Mr. Arizona HW & Overall, Jr. Nationals HW 16th, Smoked at USA's

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            • #7
              Hi DC_catholic315,

              Yes, that's what I'm doing: DB Prone Rows, Cable row with hammer grip extension - and the Trap Bar

              Leg trainings is: QUADS: Squat (20 reps); Bulgarian Split Squat (6-9; 9-12); Leg Press (20-30 reps)
              HAMS: Lying leg curl; Romanian deadlift, Seated leg curl.

              Comment


              • #8
                Hi SAHD,

                Yes, the trap bar has been great, especially as deadlifts are an issue.

                It's a pretty unstoppable piece of equipment.

                Thanks,
                D-Ap

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi homonunculus,

                  I pretty much feel the trap bar dead all over. I've therefore slotted it into my "back thickness" workout. Using it on C1 workout while the squat is on A2. Trying to keep a little distance between them.

                  I'm doing the 2-day split. I'm 49, and only just started DC, but beginning to form the opinion that Doggcrapp done on a 2-day split, 3 times a week, might be one of the best routines for the older, non-enhanced trainee - and, arguably, that's even for an intermediate lifter. I'll cogitate on that view for a few weeks while I'm running DC, and post in the future why I feel like that.

                  Thanks for the advice,
                  D-Ap

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Whether you feel it in your quads or back is most times an issue of execution. With the trap bar, it tends to keep you more upright so there would be more quad involvement the more upright you are. With a regular bar, you don't have that luxury due to the fact that the legs are in the way of the bar forcing the bar out further in front of you which causes more work to be done by the back.

                    Skip


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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ken "Skip" Hill View Post
                      Whether you feel it in your quads or back is most times an issue of execution. With the trap bar, it tends to keep you more upright so there would be more quad involvement the more upright you are. With a regular bar, you don't have that luxury due to the fact that the legs are in the way of the bar forcing the bar out further in front of you which causes more work to be done by the back.

                      Skip
                      Hi,

                      Yes, you're absolutely right, of course; it does keep you upright, most of the impact seems to be in the quads. I do feel it in the upper back, too, if I concentrate on the "pull".

                      D-Ap

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