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Advice from old war horses

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  • Advice from old war horses

    Quick stats:
    23, male, training with various levels intensity 7 years, lifetime super muscularity project ~1.5 years, 230 lbs, ~10% bf.

    Hello, I'll try to be concise and write to the best of my ability. I've been DC'ing for 9 months and have seen fantastic results, I'm certainly the strongest and largest I've ever been, second at my university to my friend and work out partner who also happens to be a subscriber to DC of 3 years.
    I have a nagging back injury (from age 18) that until recently I thought was a bulging disk giving me sciatic nerve complications and lower back pain which caused stiffness, hamstring tightness and piriformis tightness. I correctly treated many of the flare-ups of pain by adjusting form (watching external hip rotation, which when I was new to lifting probably was a major factor in my injury), increasing my core strength (not skipping my direct ab work). Everything has been fine until recently I started working construction for the summer and my back pain has flared up (an overuse caused flare up I believe as even pounding weights 3x/week prior to working was giving me no problem). I ceased lifting immediately when I could tell my back was compromised and an x-ray has revealed a fracture called spondylolysis. Whether or not this was the original injury from years ago or not remains to be seen (I've an order for a ct scan which will shed more light). Since spondylolysis is most common in adolescents involved in sports such as weight lifting, gymnastics etc, this would make sense. I have not seen an orthopedic doctor, just my gp and chiropractor with my chiropractor offering 3-6 months without lifting (I'm okay with this if it means long-term healthy lifting career) plus isometric core work, ultra sound therapy etc but no bracing as the injury isn't new. My gp is deferring giving advice until we get the ct scans done.

    http://www.ericcressey.com/newsletter114html

    I found this site on recovering from this type of injury doing a quick search, very informative. Some of the information doesn't pertain to me (rotary stability, overall strengthening etc.) but I will check out more on ankle mobility (thinking this is not an issue the way we train calves). I'm concerned about the author's advice at the end about not letting their trainees squat for 9 months after being injured because compression being a problem. I'm of the opinion that in our environment of controlled movement and under proper form the negative effects of compression would be mitigated. What are your thoughts on this?

    My question to the sages is, given the circumstances what would you do? At the end of the day, super muscularity will be a lifelong pursuit of mine and I will do all I can to remain safe and push harder another day.

  • #2
    go see an orthopedic doctor. Spondylolysis isn't something I'd ignore and wouldn't spend a lot of time looking at various websites for info.
    sigpic

    For physical training is of some value, but godliness has value for all things, holding promise for both the present life and the life to come.
    1 Timothy 4:8

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