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  • Tips or tricks?

    Anyone Have any interesting tips or tricks. One I have begun doing is slowing down my weight jumps. I try and keep it around 10 lbs. Then I shoot for the same # of reps as last week. I try and keep my rep range in the 13-18 except for quads. This allows me to get more near failure reps in my Rest pauses. I am also trying to pay attention to over all work. work=Mass+distance. So if I Bench 100lbs for 10 reps that is a 1000. If the next week I go to 110 and only get 9 reps that is only 990 which would actually be less work than the time before. By keeping my rep range higher and weight jumps smaller I am able to constantly increase my workload. What do you guys think? I am also going to start calculating my work load from the begining of the blast to the end. And then try and push myself blast to blast.


    Log Book PIMP! It ain't a crime if it likes it!

  • #2
    RT, Lets not get out of hand here, as long as your are increasing your weight or reps, I don't care if you are using 1 1/4 per side you are still progressing and that is what makes mass and strength.

    So don't go overanalyzing the lbs moved per workout go by the intensity of each and every workset you do...
    "That damn log book"

    www.trueprotein.com Highest quality protein at the lowest price...

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    • #3
      I agree with In-Human

      You can get carried aways with the analysis, which can take away from the focus and intensity you need. And I'm sure you have better things to do with your extra time anyhow

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RaulJimenez
        damn , bobo is loose in this forum lock him inhuman ! :P
        LOLOL...
        "That damn log book"

        www.trueprotein.com Highest quality protein at the lowest price...

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        • #5
          Although I agree that he may be overanalyzing slightly, it might be interesting to see how this turns out if he uses it as an experiment and doesn't live and die by those calculations. It does work out to less of a workload so I see the point.
          www.trueprotein.com........best protein around!!

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          • #6
            I see his point too, but I'm not very good at math sooo....LOL

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            • #7
              Ok the point is that in the old high volume days I did this too added up my workouts, I used to move on average 100,000 lbs per workout, now I train 3 days a week with 15 exercises a week and I don't move 1/10 of what I used to in the total workout and look how much mass I gained!...
              "That damn log book"

              www.trueprotein.com Highest quality protein at the lowest price...

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              • #8
                OK IH, very good point. I didn't even think of it that way.

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                • #9
                  It's funny because alot of people still recommend the old 'push more calculated weight each time so that you progress' thing. A hell of a lot of advanced bodybuilders still believe in it too. It's true that more weight pushed each workout means progression, but just because you squatted 5000 lbs your last workout and then stripped down to the bar and did it four times meaning 5180 your second workout, that doesn't mean you are going to progress too much, hehe.

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                  • #10
                    US, I know now that is it more intensity coupled with progressive weight increases and recouperation that makes the difference...
                    "That damn log book"

                    www.trueprotein.com Highest quality protein at the lowest price...

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                    • #11
                      My main point I think was missed. This is what I came up with for me after analyzing what made a good work out and what made a poor one. I can generate more intensity in an exercise when I keep my Rest paused total in the rep range of 13-18. When I fell down to 9-10 reps I did not do enough work-even though my weight was higher. By keeping the reps in the 13-18 range I keep the workload higher. One thing I am doing now is to slow down my weight jumps. I am not going from 225 to 255 even if I feel I can hit it for 8. I go to 235 and keep my reps up in the 13 ish range. At 15 I always increase my weight. This may be second nature to most of you but it is something that was new to me.

                      IH I am using this concept only as it applies to DC style workouts. It is apples to oranges when comparing strictly to high volume because of overtraining.


                      Log Book PIMP! It ain't a crime if it likes it!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by rugbythug
                        My main point I think was missed. This is what I came up with for me after analyzing what made a good work out and what made a poor one. I can generate more intensity in an exercise when I keep my Rest paused total in the rep range of 13-18. When I fell down to 9-10 reps I did not do enough work-even though my weight was higher. By keeping the reps in the 13-18 range I keep the workload higher. One thing I am doing now is to slow down my weight jumps. I am not going from 225 to 255 even if I feel I can hit it for 8. I go to 235 and keep my reps up in the 13 ish range. At 15 I always increase my weight. This may be second nature to most of you but it is something that was new to me.

                        IH I am using this concept only as it applies to DC style workouts. It is apples to oranges when comparing strictly to high volume because of overtraining.
                        Ok then this is what I tell some people I do, I give myself a magic number of reps that when I meet that specific number I add weight, every exercises is different, for Chest I like 15RP, for Biceps I like 18RP, so when I get there I move up since I know not enough reps will seem as though you are not getting enough work load, but you really are since you added weight, but you still must at least hit the lowest number of reps for that exercise even when you increase weight...
                        "That damn log book"

                        www.trueprotein.com Highest quality protein at the lowest price...

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                        • #13
                          Good insight IH, I do the same thing.

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                          • #14
                            This is what I do also-But when I first started I was so aggressive with my weight jumps I was not getting the reps and felt like I was not doing enough work. But now I make smaller more frequent weight increases.


                            Log Book PIMP! It ain't a crime if it likes it!

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                            • #15
                              RT, Trust me all new trainees make major jumps at the beginning and of course they will slow down as you progress and get heavier and heavier, that also why you will need to do cruises at a much more frequent time as the weights increase and so does your intensity while using more weight...
                              "That damn log book"

                              www.trueprotein.com Highest quality protein at the lowest price...

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