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Any tricks for flat bb press?

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  • Any tricks for flat bb press?

    We just started incorporating flat bb chest press into our routine. I feel so dang weak on this exercise! I'm 5'2"-117 pounds and can only press 115#. Is there some kind of trick to lift heavier? Hand placement? Arch back? Legs on bench? Legs on floor? I can do 45# db incline presses-which I thought was awesome, but my flat bb sucks! Any suggestions?

  • #2
    The suggestion is to not do it.

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    • #3
      Don't say that! I w/o with hubby and he wants to start doing it.....why do you say that? My goal is to bench 135 for now. I'm not whining....just looking for tips.

      Thanks US M!

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      • #4
        Couple things: it is a new movement and it will take time for your body to master it. feet on the bench will isolate the pectorals, feet on the floor will incorporate supporting muscles allowing you to use more weight. Concentrate on mastering the movement and getting good quality reps, the weight will increase over time.
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        • #5
          But this is the Dogg Pound. The ones around here that really know about this exercise know that it puts you in a very compromising position and puts you at risk for a muscle tear than any other exercise out there. Amazingly overrated and dangerous exercise if you ask me *and just about anyone else around here*. There are better pec developers, stick to Incline/Decline movements and some chest press machines are OK too.

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          • #6
            I just popped into members pics and saw Leaddog flat bench injury! Yikes. What a godsend that was! Right after posting this thread......checking out his pics. All right captain! Will be more careful on this exercise....if anything...I will not try and per fect it! Thanks all!

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            • #7
              Make sure when u press the weight back up that the bar doesnt drift upwards towards ur head, that usually means the pecs dont have enough strength to do the work and you start to use your shoulders, at the point you could risk injuring urself.

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              • #8
                Flat Barbell Benching has a stigma in DC training, and to anybody whos got lots of lifting experience and a sensible ego. It's an injury maker - think blown pecs and shoulders and it's the all time number one ego lift. I'd focus on getting a big incline and decline bench, bugger the flat or you might bugger your body.
                Training Like Crapp Takes Intensity

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                • #9
                  Thanks guys! Your advice is totally appreciated!

                  Hey asim this is my 100th post! You're at that mark too! Congrats buc!

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                  • #10
                    lol 100 posts already cant be. It only feels like 30 or so.

                    Yea everyone here is right about the flat benching, just watch you dont let your ego get the best of you, otherwise you'll be in trouble.

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                    • #11
                      Island Girl, You will increase your strength a lot by doing Inclines and Declines BB, these will be your best bet, you still can do Flats if you feel you have to, but the others will make you much stronger and over time its not worth the shoulder problems that can come about...
                      "That damn log book"

                      www.trueprotein.com Highest quality protein at the lowest price...

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                      • #12
                        I'll do that In Human!

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                        • #13
                          believe me. i loved flat bench more than anything. and i was damn good at it. being that i was 18 and pushing 430lbs. but like everyone has said, it's dangerous. i found out the hard way. when i come back think i'll stick to decline and incline and avoid the flats.

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                          • #14
                            Hey Island Girl,
                            First off, I'm not going against anyone but I personally like flat bench. I come from a powerlifting background and have trained and trained with many powerlifters and bodybuilders all who liked the bench. I've also seen quite a few torn pecs including my own. (only a partial tear but will always have a nice little hole. Anyway, in most bench injuries the problem was form. When the bar is brought down high on the chest with elbows pulled back and a moderate to wide grip with very little back arch as it's usually described as the best way to target pecs it places way too much stress on the pec tendon. What most of us do (myself included and I can bench again with no pain as a result) is get a really big arch wich rolls the shoulders back into almost a decline position. We use a narrower grip (about 3 inches out from shoulder width on each side) Most women find this about 1/2 a thumbs length from the beginning of the knurl. Most of the guys will go no further out than pinky finger on the power ring. We keep our chest high and bring the bar to the nipples or even just below the nip's while keeping the elbows under the bar (which is slightly forward) a lot of good powerlifters will let there triceps scrape right by their ribcage and flare their lats out at the bottom to give the bar a little "push" through the sticking point. Now you may be thinking "But doesnt it make sense to go lighter and target the pecs more?" No because even though a greater pecentage of the weight will be placed on the pecs using the BBer style the "power" technique will allow you to use more weight and therefore the same amount of stress will be placed on the muscle along with the added stress to the shoulders and triceps (which is the reason compound exercises are desirable in the first place). Also the pec tondon will be placed in a "safer" position and the rotator cuff will be in a more favorable position as well. Many of the guys I train are in the 500 lb bench club with no pec injuries yet and the best is my best freind Al's brother Joe Bianchi who now holds the world drugfree record in the 198's (not sure which federation) at 545 and has come within 3" of 585 in the gym. My own bench is not quite so impressive but I have managed 315 for 15 since coming back from my pec injury. Before the injury 405 for 5 was my best. (unfortunately right now I am coming back from a grappling injury and cannot even bench but look forward to being well past that by the end of the year. My suggestion is to perfect the arch keep the elbows under the bar and at least pulled slightly forward and bring the bar low on your chest. By the way I'm not saying bench is the best exercise just trying to help you out with it. The reason no one hardly gets injured doing inclines is because the shoulders take on alot of the work so the pec tendon isn't overloaded as much. And no one gets hurt doing declines because they put your shoulder in the position it should be on the flat bench. So if you can't find your "power groove" on the bench stick with inclines and declines. If you can find the right "power groove" the bench can be a great exercise.

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                            • #15
                              sammysdad, Great post, but bad news, you are banned, hehe...
                              "That damn log book"

                              www.trueprotein.com Highest quality protein at the lowest price...

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