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  • 53greystreet
    replied
    53Greystreet, I sent an email to you a while ago but never heard back. Looking at starting in Jan/Feb with you if you still have openings.
    My apologies man, I just searched my last month of e-mails and did not see it. Not sure what happened to it. Can you please re-send?

    Either way I am happy to help and Jan/Feb will work great. I believe once you see something put together it will help

    Leave a comment:


  • DCBliever
    replied
    Originally posted by bbjeff86 View Post
    I guess my main question is how do you know when to change an exercise out... do you just keep it in until you don't progress, constantly vary reps/percentages, change tempo, etc.

    I've been following 5/3/1 and like the easiness of it, but would like to utilize more lift specific exercises for assistance work. Would I just change those lifts to some degree (still keeping them close to the main lifts) for all the assistance work, and stay the course with the main 5/3/1 lifts?

    53Greystreet, I sent an email to you a while ago but never heard back. Looking at starting in Jan/Feb with you if you still have openings.
    It depends on the phase I agree they have dumb names, it depends on where you are in the training year or meet cycle off seson. You do lifts that mimic the competition lifts in the accumulation or higher volume lower intensity phase, then you'd switch to the specifice lifts for transmutaton and realization. Realization is only used for peaking for a meet. You want your assistance work to include lifts that have more carrover to the specific exercises, so a CGBP instead of a pressdown

    Leave a comment:


  • bbjeff86
    replied
    I guess my main question is how do you know when to change an exercise out... do you just keep it in until you don't progress, constantly vary reps/percentages, change tempo, etc.

    I've been following 5/3/1 and like the easiness of it, but would like to utilize more lift specific exercises for assistance work. Would I just change those lifts to some degree (still keeping them close to the main lifts) for all the assistance work, and stay the course with the main 5/3/1 lifts?

    53Greystreet, I sent an email to you a while ago but never heard back. Looking at starting in Jan/Feb with you if you still have openings.

    Leave a comment:


  • Adam2433
    replied
    In a quick read of some EFS articles it seems to overcomplicate things. And I can't help but laugh at the names of "phases".

    Maybe I'm missing something but the gist I am gathering is...

    - Start out with more volume and more accessory work to build work capacity and muscle

    - As you get closer to a meet taper up the intensity as you back off the volume. Drop some isolation accessory work

    - Right before the meet work your heaviest weights on the competition lifts and do very little to no accessory work.

    - Use deloads.

    Isn't that the premise of all programs guys are having success with? Like I said maybe the devil's in the details...

    Leave a comment:


  • 53greystreet
    replied
    I read any and all articles on EFS when trying to learn about Block. I bought the Block Periodization book by Issurin which is very good. It is not geared towards powerlifting at all but helps understand the concepts.

    Things did not fully click for me until I hired Landon Evans and worked directly with him for 6 months. He was able to teach me a tremendous amount. He really knows his stuff. Applying the information I learned from him to my team has been very successful.

    Before working with Landon I also was able to use one of my lifters as sort of a guinea pig where I was constantly trying out new and different ideas. This really honed in my ability to develop programs. His lifts did go up by a big margin so he was also happy, hahaha

    Leave a comment:


  • DCBliever
    replied
    Originally posted by bbjeff86 View Post
    Can anyone recommend some good reading material so I can get a better grasp on setting up the rep/percentage schemes with this and how often to rotate exercises?
    Tjat article and vershonsky may have one also I believe, really its based off prilepins chart. You could go very well off those two articles for explanation, I think the book is like $100

    Edit: it is Vladimir Issurin
    Last edited by DCBliever; 12-08-2012, 08:28 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • bbjeff86
    replied
    Can anyone recommend some good reading material so I can get a better grasp on setting up the rep/percentage schemes with this and how often to rotate exercises?

    Leave a comment:


  • DEADn
    replied
    Originally posted by 53greystreet View Post
    Block may be used from beginners up through advanced. Given it is set up properly for the individual at hand of course. The flexibility is outstanding with this programming.

    Using my team for an example again- some lifters on my team have been competing for less than a year and some of the Elite lifters have been going for over 15 years. I modify each plan for the specific lifter and their needs. Now there will be certain scheduling/principles that will be the same at times.

    If anyone has any questions, please feel free to ask
    It looks intriguing but I may need to stay with what I am doing already which is the 5/3/1 method. I wish it would move a little faster up the weight scale though but it does seem to keep me away from injury so far.

    In the past while doing rest pause stuff and having some bad form, in the process, I got a twisted upper spine as well as disc herniation a couple of times which stopped me from weightlifting for a couple of year off and one.

    Leave a comment:


  • DCBliever
    replied
    This is something I've been using with great results, the big thing is CARRY OVER, I've always done a workout with 2-3 big multi joint compound movements. Like Today, deadlift and manta ray olympic squats. I see people do a ton of assistance work, will big movements like CG Bench get you more carry over than pressdowns? Shit yeah, Dante Preached it with his DC training, big movements, I speak from the raw side of things. I'm not the biggest totaler in the country but I'm getting better every meet and I attribute it to this. You want to be better at a lift? Do the lift, vary your reps and percentages or do a variation of the lift to not burn out motor patterns.

    I'm beginning to think less of partial movements, if you miss it's because your force or speed throughout the lift sucks, so you train at your sticking point, well is that really where you fail say at a 2 board height? No you more than likely fail prior to that because your not fast or strong enough to accelerate through that point, I read an article by one of Mike Turscherer's Reactive Training guys, also teach yourself to grind. I'm going off on a tangent but yes block periodization is key.

    Leave a comment:


  • 53greystreet
    replied
    Originally posted by DEADn View Post
    I block periodization for intermediate and advanced lifter or also for beginners? I have or am transitioning from regular weightlifting over to strength training. Dare I call it powerlifting. I just want to train for strength as my base and do a little higher reps to help that strength but also put mass on my bones. My key though is strength.
    Block may be used from beginners up through advanced. Given it is set up properly for the individual at hand of course. The flexibility is outstanding with this programming.

    Using my team for an example again- some lifters on my team have been competing for less than a year and some of the Elite lifters have been going for over 15 years. I modify each plan for the specific lifter and their needs. Now there will be certain scheduling/principles that will be the same at times.

    If anyone has any questions, please feel free to ask

    Leave a comment:


  • DEADn
    replied
    I block periodization for intermediate and advanced lifter or also for beginners? I have or am transitioning from regular weightlifting over to strength training. Dare I call it powerlifting. I just want to train for strength as my base and do a little higher reps to help that strength but also put mass on my bones. My key though is strength.

    Leave a comment:


  • 53greystreet
    replied
    Originally posted by bbjeff86 View Post
    What are some of the more experienced guys input on this style of training for a raw lifter. I like the idea of more frequency, with less volume, and could see some benefit, but would like some feedback from guys with more powerlifting (particularly raw lifters) experience: http://articles.elitefts.com/trainin...d-and-revised/
    The beauty of this system is it works for raw, geared, football, track + field, etc

    My team is currently about half raw, half geared. I have all of them on a block sequencing plan and everyone is hitting PR's. There are some slight exercise choice differences but the plans are very similar. The geared lifters do more specific overload work. I still have the raw lifters do some overload work but not as much and utilizing a smaller amount of overload.

    I even have some lifters who flip flop back and forth between geared and raw meets. This type of training makes it easy to do

    Leave a comment:


  • Adam2433
    replied
    Originally posted by DEADn View Post
    I can't add to what you are asking but I do want to add another question to this. I noticed an exercise in there called 'Rolling tricep extensions'. I found it on youtube and have never seen it before. Yet, I wondered, do powerlifters use this exercise at all?
    I have seen many guys do them and I have done them myself. I think they're ok. Not a staple for me as I would rather do something close grip. I get far more out of extensions when using a barbell/EZ bar as they allow more weight to be moved.

    Try them out though and see what you think.

    Leave a comment:


  • big ross
    replied
    Originally posted by bbjeff86 View Post
    What are some of the more experienced guys input on this style of training for a raw lifter. I like the idea of more frequency, with less volume, and could see some benefit, but would like some feedback from guys with more powerlifting (particularly raw lifters) experience: http://articles.elitefts.com/trainin...d-and-revised/
    DCB would be a good one to chime in. I read the article and it feels like I'm reading Chinese, but the idea is interesting to me.

    Leave a comment:


  • DEADn
    replied
    I can't add to what you are asking but I do want to add another question to this. I noticed an exercise in there called 'Rolling tricep extensions'. I found it on youtube and have never seen it before. Yet, I wondered, do powerlifters use this exercise at all?

    Leave a comment:

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