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  • Get Your Off On.

    In my last thread, we discussed the greatest lift ever....... the reg park press. If you missed that thread, here it is:

    http://intensemuscle.com/showthread.php?t=45093

    (And yes, the above thread is the greatest fucking thread in internet history.)

    Moving right along........ let's talk about something else that is fun, exciting, and can lead lifters to huge numbers, better recovery, and lots of vagina.

    We are going to Get Our Off On.........

    By that, I mean we are going to discuss how to train on off days.

    "But wait a second Duck, why would we train on off days?" "Aren't we suppose to take the day off on off days?"

    The answer, of course, is NO. So go ahead and punch yourself in the dick.

    (Actually, go fuck yourself instead of punching yourself in the dick. I have to refrain from talking about dicks, because Sammich will accuse me of having an unhealthy obsession with dicks. So no dick talk.)

    99.9% of the time, my training split looks something like this:

    day 1 - squat variation, press variation, pull variation.
    day 2 - "off days" - (will explain below)
    day 3 - repeat

    I lift heavy and I train by feel. But that is neither here or there. I only mention this, because what I do on my off days has drastically improved my recovery and by and large has increased all my lifts.

    If you ever venture over to Tnation, you might have read about a concept called neural charge training. Here is a link:
    http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_...harge_training

    In a nutshell, Christin Thib says not to take days off. Even on your off days, you should select a neural charge lift and perform that lift.

    I rarely go to Tnation and I could give a shit less about Christian Thib, but I am a huge believer in the neural charge concept.

    Thib says to go to the gym and basically pick something that is compound, and do it for 10 minutes or so......... more or less long enough to break a sweat, then go home.

    Power snatches and power cleans are great examples. Throw a light weight on there or just use an empty bar and do a couple of sets of whatever, and go home. Westside does a similar thing called gpp. Westside people will pull sleds to build up the body's capacity to handle heavy loads. Wendler will throw conditioning workouts into his routine....... a couple of hill sprints here and there in between his main workout days.

    These are all great examples of what you can do on off days. My only problem with Thib's suggestion, is there is no way in hell I am going to be able to go all the way to the gym, do one lift for 10 minutes, and then quit. I know me and I know once I am at the gym, I am going to do a bunch of shit. That's just me.

    So........

    Here is what I suggest.

    step 1)

    Get yourself a DVR and start recording pro wrestling. Monday night Raw, TNA on Thursday nights, Smackdown on Friday nights, and Ring of Honor on Saturday nights.

    step 2)

    Get yourself an ab wheel. Wal-Mart has them. They are the best 7 bucks you will ever spend.

    step 3)

    Get yourself a kettlebell. I got a 35 pound kettlebell from Craig's List for 9 dollars.

    step 4)

    On your off days, while watching the pro wrestling that you have recorded on your DVR, knock out some ab wheel rollouts, goblet squats, pushups, kb swings, and kb power snatches.

    You don't have to do all five lifts, you can pick one or two. Every time a commercial pops on, do some reps. Don't go fucking crazy and kill yourself. Again, get the blood flowing, possibly break a sweat, and keep the shit simple.

    I have been doing this shit for several months now, and my recovery is better, my flexibility is better, I sleep better, my lifts are better, and I don't have to drive all the way to the gym, just to do 10 minutes worth of stuff that I can do in my living room while watching pro wrestling.

    (If you don't like pro wrestling, go fuck yourself.)

    There is literally tons of shit on the web about active recovery. Obviously this is not a new concept. People have different things that they do on their off days to recover inbetween their main workout days.

    People sit in a sauna, take a hot bath with epsom salt mixed in the water, get a massage, go for a walk, pull a sled, push a prowler, do a yoga class, swing a kettlebell, penetrate vagina, foam roll, stretch, and whatever the fuck else people do.

    Off days do not have to be off days. But not everyday should be a main day, either. Listen to your body, lift heavy, smash vagina, eat your face off, and don't over think shit.

    So, in conclusion, it's time to man up and become the master of your destiny. Get your Squat on, Get your Reg Park Press on, Get your Deadlift on, and Get your Off on.

    Now go smack the guy doing cable crossovers and tell him to put a bar on his back and squat something.

    Tom Platz squatted 500 pounds for 23 reps....... what the fuck is your excuse?
    "One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish." - Dr. Suess

  • #2
    great post...in 2009 i got smoked in the masters class by a 53yr old BB'er. He told me he only lifts 3-4xweek but that he made a decision to exercise every single day for the rest of his life unless he was too physically ill too.....same theory, push-ups/pull-ups/cardio oly lifts etc.
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    • #3
      Sub'd.
      You're perfect, yes it's true. But without me...you're only you.

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      • #4
        Duck's posts are always eggcellent.
        PM me to discuss website/video/dvd etc. related work.

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        • #5
          Penetrating vagina counts, but only if you can last 10 minutes? Can I do 3 sets of 3.333 minutes or does it have to be one long set?
          2014 USPA Nevada State / Regional Championships - 1,168 total

          2014 USPA National Championships - 1,235 total

          2014 Village Gym Meet - 1,260 total

          2015 USPA Camp Pendleton Meet - 1,235 total


          Journal: http://intensemuscle.com/showthread....80#post1112980

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          • #6
            DDG,

            How much has this increased your lifts?...

            --Which lifts in particular and from what to what?...

            -------

            So, you're saying I can use this strategy on the "off" days of any program, irregardless of any other programming variables - basically that by doing what you suggest, you can enhance the results of any program?...


            -Scott
            The Book Has Arrived!
            The Book Has Arrived!

            Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a pristine, well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, used up, worn out, and shouting, "Holy #$&^%$^... What a ride!!!"


            www.TrueNutrition.com

            2012 NPC Master's Nationals HW 5th. Mid-USA HW & Overall
            2010 NPC Jr. USA HW 4th, Pacific USA Heavy 2nd
            2009 NPC Mr. Arizona HW & Overall, Jr. Nationals HW 16th, Smoked at USA's

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            • #7
              Originally posted by homonunculus View Post
              DDG,

              How much has this increased your lifts?...

              --Which lifts in particular and from what to what?...

              -------

              So, you're saying I can use this strategy on the "off" days of any program, irregardless of any other programming variables - basically that by doing what you suggest, you can enhance the results of any program?...


              -Scott
              Biggest improvements have come on my overhead work, wide stance squats, and my bench has finally started to move, but I feel that it has only started to move by a combination of my overhead work going up and the active recovery on my "off days."

              Four years ago I pretty much stopped training shoulders, simply because I thought I didn't need to, because I was powerlifting. I figured my bench training would be enough. (Obviously, I was an idiot.)

              So I woke up one day and I was 32 years old and I couldn't put 135 pounds over my head unless I did a super duper push press. I have been lifting for 12 years, and I come to the realization that this was truly pathetic.

              With the help of Redskull, I finally got my technique down and learned how to properly do a standing strict press. One would think that a standing strict press would be easy to perform, but it took me forever to finally figure out how to do this lift correctly. Since April of this year, my strict press went from 125 pounds to 185 pounds. (I just hit the 185 last week.)

              That has been my biggest improvement. Obviously, the strict press went up because I was consistent with it, and for the most part, it was a new lift for me. So I can't say that the active recovery on the off days was the sole reason it improved. I can say that the active recovery kept the "gears greased," and made me feel fresher, which in turn, caused me to lift more. (I sometimes do strict presses 3 times a week.)

              Without the active recovery, I don't think I would have been able to press as often as I do. I have always been a volume kind of guy, and I feel the active recovery plays a vital role in enabling me to hit my body with a shit load of volume.

              To answer your question, yes, I think a person can do some type of active recovery regardless of the methodology they are following, especially if that person tends to train in a full body type of style.

              Full body splits have been around forever. The most common, of which, is a squat/push/pull split, done three times a week. (5 x 5 is a great example of that.)

              mon -
              squat
              bench
              row

              wed -
              squat
              press
              deadlift

              fri -
              squat
              bench
              row

              Every one is pretty much familiar with this setup and this training style is nothing revolutionary, especially with lifters focusing on strength.

              And again, active recovery is no new concept. By doing something easy, light, and "refreshing" on your off days, you set yourself up for success on your main days.

              You see stuff like this everywhere you look on the web...... westsiders pulling sleds for gpp on their off days. Christian Thib talking about barbell complexes and circuits for his clients on their off days. Wendler running hill sprints on his off days, Joe DeFranco doing battle ropes with his athletes, Dan John doing weighted carries of some sort for his shot put throwers........ most of the stuff you see about active recovery, tends to be geared more towards sport athletes, strength athletes, olympic lifters, etc. etc.

              Bodybuilding is a horse of a different color. It's the hardest sport on the planet, and it plays by it's own rules. If I only trained chest on Mondays and my workout consisted of incline db presses, weighted dips, cable crossovers, and db pullovers, I doubt I would go into the gym the next day and do power snatches until I broke a sweat and then go home. In that scenario, I don't think power snatches as an active recovery movement is going to do much for you. I think a person would be better off doing something else on their "off" day........ stretching and of course rest is going to do a body good more so on the bodybuilding side of the house.

              I am obviously rambling here, and I hope I answered your question. I am by no means an expert on bodybuilding, so again, its hard to say which active recovery technique would be better, when compared to a strength template.

              If I am squatting on Monday and then Front squatting on Wednesday, I know on Tuesday, I have to do something light to get the blood flowing so I am ready for Wednesday.

              I will say this........ since I started throwing in active recovery stuff on my off days, I almost never stretch. I don't feel that I have to. However, when I followed a bodybuilding template, if I didn't stretch, I would be so stupid sore, that I would not even want to get out of bed.

              Again, regardless of someone's template, a person is going to be better off doing something, as opposed to doing nothing on "off" days.

              If anyone else reading this thread has anything to throw in on this topic, by all means, jump in and lets us know your experiences. I would be curious to hear some feedback on active recovery, especially from the bodybuilding guys.
              "One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish." - Dr. Suess

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              • #8
                second greatest fucking thread in internet history

                Comment


                • #9
                  Good read

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                  • #10
                    DDG,

                    You sort of answered my question.

                    I wanted to know SPECIFICALLY, from what weight (with reps or 1RM) to what weight. I'm wanting to exactly how much stronger you've gotten on specific exercises (now we know about your overhead press).

                    It seems you're saying this will not pan out for bodybuilding.

                    My question was not whether you CAN do this for ANY program (we'll limit to to strength / power focused training), but whether it will ENHANCE results for ANY program.

                    Sure, you'll find active recovery as a component in programs, but you seem to be making a blanket statement that this will enhance the results of ANY strength training program, even if a full rest day is built in intentionally.

                    -S
                    Last edited by homonunculus; 12-28-2011, 12:51 AM.
                    The Book Has Arrived!
                    The Book Has Arrived!

                    Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a pristine, well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, used up, worn out, and shouting, "Holy #$&^%$^... What a ride!!!"


                    www.TrueNutrition.com

                    2012 NPC Master's Nationals HW 5th. Mid-USA HW & Overall
                    2010 NPC Jr. USA HW 4th, Pacific USA Heavy 2nd
                    2009 NPC Mr. Arizona HW & Overall, Jr. Nationals HW 16th, Smoked at USA's

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Tell me more about this "vagina smashing" business.
                      Max Muscle
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                      www.MaxMuscleLosAlamitos.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by homonunculus View Post
                        DDG,

                        You sort of answered my question.

                        I wanted to know SPECIFICALLY, from what weight (with reps or 1RM) to what weight. I'm wanting to exactly how much stronger you've gotten on specific exercises (now we know about your overhead press).

                        It seems you're saying this will not pan out for bodybuilding.

                        My question was not whether you CAN do this for ANY program (we'll limit to to strength / power focused training), but whether it will ENHANCE results for ANY program.

                        Sure, you'll find active recovery as a component in programs, but you seem to be making a blanket statement that this will enhance the results of ANY strength training program, even if a full rest day is built in intentionally.

                        -S

                        Sorry about that, I will be more specific.

                        April, 2011 to Present: (starting from April, cause I was injured the first part of this year, and didn't train heavy Jan - March.)

                        standing strict press - 135 to 185, one rep max
                        flat bench press - 270 to 290, one rep max
                        deadlift - 440 - 465, one rep max
                        wide stance squats - 340 - 365, one rep max

                        I have increased on other lifts, such as zercher style squats, zercher good mornings, barbell rows, weighted chinups, behind the neck push presses, and a few others. I usually only reserve my true maxes for the "big four," which is what I post above.

                        If you want me to be a little more specific, let me know. I keep a journal and could thumb through it for specific lifts.

                        I would agree that my original post would mostly apply to strength/power focused training. As far as it panning out for bodybuilding, I would say yes, it would probably not pan out. (again, i am hoping some bodybuilders on here can provide some feedback in that regard.)

                        Do I think it will enhance results for any strength/power focused program...... Yes i do.

                        I agree with you, a person is going to find active recovery built in to just about every strength/power focused program. The only exception to this that I can think of, is the russian squat routine. That routine has an individual squatting 3 times a week for 6 weeks at 80% of their one rep max and several of the training days are higher than 80%. From what I have read about that routine, resting is mandatory. (Obviously, this is a radical example.)

                        If my original post came across as a blanket statement, that was not my intention. I was mostly speaking of my own experiences and I was pointing out that a good portion of the popular strength routines that people are currently familiar with, have active recovery components built into the program that will enhance a person's progress.

                        examples, of course, being sled pulling for westside, hill sprints for wendler's 5/3/1, christian thib's neural charge workouts, etc. etc.

                        I don't own a sled, and I live no where near a hill, and going to the gym for 10 minutes to do power snatches is not ideal for me, so I was merely pointing out what I do for active recovery on my off days...... I swing kettlebells and do ab wheel rollouts during the commercial breaks of my favorite wrestling shows, (amongst other lifts.)

                        And again, I am not trying to talk about some new radical concept or pretend I invented active recovery. Like I said before, everything I have said is nothing new. This stuff is in just about every program you see nowadays, and I am just merely pointing out examples of how my active recovery choices have enhanced my lifting.

                        To comment on your last statement in your above post, I never really touched on the topic of intentional rest days that are built in to programs. If a person wants to take a day off, that's their business. I take days off, same as everyone else. I have off days where I don't do shit and I have off days where I do active recovery stuff. Once again, if I gave the impression that I am telling people to workout every single day of their life, that is not what I was implying. Do I think a person is going to hinder their progress if they do happen to do something every day of their life..... not at all. Do I think a person should throw in some active recovery stuff on their off days..... absolutely.

                        Again, I think it all boils down to how someone feels and listening to their bodies.

                        I also think people need to read. I learned a shit load from reading articles, peoples blogs, websites, etc. etc. I took what I thought made sense to me, applied it to my lifting, figured out what worked and what it didn't, and now I am sharing that with people.

                        Will active recovery and doing stuff on off days enhance a person's progress on strength/power focused routines........ Yes, in my opinion, I feel that it will.

                        I hope I answered your questions and again, by all means, please share your experiences, if you like.

                        (It's just nice to see some action in the powerlifting forum.)
                        "One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish." - Dr. Suess

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Trucelt gave one example of it working for a BB'r. This of course does not make it a rule.

                          I've switched to a full body routine and i do the active recovery WO's on my "off" days as well. Initiailly i did these because i was so used to lifting 4-5 times a week doing a BB type split, that it just felt wrong not doing something. Also, i think of active recovery as just being active. I'll do mobility work, ab work, light weight stuff just to get blood flowing, sprints, etc. Really, it's just whatever i feel like doing that day. I also walk my dog multiple times a day for 15-30 mins each time (if i don't, the bastard starts getting into shit).

                          Point being, i don't see active recovery as a set WO where i have something planned. I see them as keeping me active and fresh.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by TLopez View Post
                            Penetrating vagina counts, but only if you can last 10 minutes? Can I do 3 sets of 3.333 minutes or does it have to be one long set?
                            First, to comment on this, the key is to rest-pause it and keep a very rhythmic breathing pattern. Works like a charm (don't believe I just used this smilely lol)

                            DDG - Great read. For powerlifting I can really see the benefits of this approach.

                            Just to comment on the experience aspect of such training, I tried something similar a long time ago but while doing a bodybuilding routine. I was basically doing a few sets of kettlebell work, some metabolic work, and mobility stuff, combined with a structured volume training approach. I was doing these things on days that were planned "off" days and over time it actually wore me down more than it helped improve my training. I experienced mental burnout and had little aches and pains in my joints from lack of rest. Looking back on it, I was young and dumb (well younger and dumber lol) and thought I could get away with anything in my training and did not structure my “active recovery” days correctly with the right exercises or use the proper intensity for recovery, so that may have been the cause, but IMO such neural charge training should not be incorporated haphazardly and needs to be planned out to work with your main training program in order to be effective. After all, you take the time to design a primo training plan, why not optimize your active recovery as well?

                            Now, doing DC training, on my off days I prefer to go for a brisk walk, stretch, and do some shoulder mobility work with light elastic band every morning. I am curious to know if anyone has tried neural charge training along with DC training, but I do not see how this would enhance the results of DC training as it may result in overworking the joints and not allowing sufficient time to recover. This is just my perspective right now, without any further knowledge or additional insight from those with more experience than me, so I'm just trying to gain a better understand of where this neural charge training can be applied most effectively and how to utilize active recovery appropriately for bodybuilding. Do you think a similar active recovery approach can be incorporated into DC training? If not, what kind of active recovery approach do you think would be most effective?
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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by dillinger09 View Post
                              Trucelt gave one example of it working for a BB'r. This of course does not make it a rule.

                              I've switched to a full body routine and i do the active recovery WO's on my "off" days as well. Initiailly i did these because i was so used to lifting 4-5 times a week doing a BB type split, that it just felt wrong not doing something. Also, i think of active recovery as just being active. I'll do mobility work, ab work, light weight stuff just to get blood flowing, sprints, etc. Really, it's just whatever i feel like doing that day. I also walk my dog multiple times a day for 15-30 mins each time (if i don't, the bastard starts getting into shit).

                              Point being, i don't see active recovery as a set WO where i have something planned. I see them as keeping me active and fresh.

                              Hey man, thanks for the feedback. And I completely agree with your point........ I also don't see active recovery as a set workout, nor do I treat it as one. Thanks for the input

                              Originally posted by mentalflex View Post
                              First, to comment on this, the key is to rest-pause it and keep a very rhythmic breathing pattern. Works like a charm (don't believe I just used this smilely lol)

                              DDG - Great read. For powerlifting I can really see the benefits of this approach.

                              Just to comment on the experience aspect of such training, I tried something similar a long time ago but while doing a bodybuilding routine. I was basically doing a few sets of kettlebell work, some metabolic work, and mobility stuff, combined with a structured volume training approach. I was doing these things on days that were planned "off" days and over time it actually wore me down more than it helped improve my training. I experienced mental burnout and had little aches and pains in my joints from lack of rest. Looking back on it, I was young and dumb (well younger and dumber lol) and thought I could get away with anything in my training and did not structure my “active recovery” days correctly with the right exercises or use the proper intensity for recovery, so that may have been the cause, but IMO such neural charge training should not be incorporated haphazardly and needs to be planned out to work with your main training program in order to be effective. After all, you take the time to design a primo training plan, why not optimize your active recovery as well?

                              Now, doing DC training, on my off days I prefer to go for a brisk walk, stretch, and do some shoulder mobility work with light elastic band every morning. I am curious to know if anyone has tried neural charge training along with DC training, but I do not see how this would enhance the results of DC training as it may result in overworking the joints and not allowing sufficient time to recover. This is just my perspective right now, without any further knowledge or additional insight from those with more experience than me, so I'm just trying to gain a better understand of where this neural charge training can be applied most effectively and how to utilize active recovery appropriately for bodybuilding. Do you think a similar active recovery approach can be incorporated into DC training? If not, what kind of active recovery approach do you think would be most effective?
                              Thanks for the feedback. And I too was once young and dumb, (still am kind of dumb.) Looking back, I can remember thinking I was bullet proof and that I could get away with going balls to the wall day in and day out. I had no idea what active recovery was, I just knew that I had to be as big as Arnold.

                              Never really thought about how this would work with DC. I think it's pretty obvious that DC is geared towards advanced lifters. A person doing DC has probably been around the block, so to speak, and knows what works for them and what doesn't. When I first stumbled across Intense Muscle 5 years ago, I did a couple of blasts on DC and quickly learned it was not for me. During that time, I still had my head up my ass and didn't know what the fuck I was doing.

                              Hopefully others will chime in and share their input. Great feedback so far.
                              "One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish." - Dr. Suess

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