Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Rest Pausing For Powerlifting

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Rest Pausing For Powerlifting

    http://www.body2build.biz/2011/06/re...erlifting.html

    The PDF is there. Give it a read. Let me know what you think. I was told that Powerlifting USA is interested in it so you get it first...and maybe last. LOL
    Last edited by Shawn "Future" Bellon; 06-30-2011, 01:27 PM.
    International Elite Raw Powerlifter
    Blood - Sweat - Chalk

  • #2
    I can't view the link from your website from work... I will try when I get a chance on my personal computer. I know Wendler says rest pausing can be good for assistance work.
    -2013 USAPL Michigan State Championships 198lb Raw Mens Open, 1st Place (1217 total)
    -2013 USAPL Texas State Championships
    198 Raw Mens Open, 2nd place (1216 total)
    -2012 USAPL Longhorn Open
    198 Raw Mens Open, 1st place (1177 total)
    -2012 USAPL Aggie Showdown
    198lb Raw Mens Open, 2nd place (1137 total)

    Comment


    • #3
      Try this

      https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&p...thkey=CISgnbwN
      Last edited by Shawn "Future" Bellon; 06-30-2011, 01:28 PM.
      International Elite Raw Powerlifter
      Blood - Sweat - Chalk

      Comment


      • #4
        Still not good, but my work has a lot of firewalls and what not set up, and a lot of webpages blocked due to the high confidential nature of material on their servers...

        No big deal, I will check it out later for sure.
        -2013 USAPL Michigan State Championships 198lb Raw Mens Open, 1st Place (1217 total)
        -2013 USAPL Texas State Championships
        198 Raw Mens Open, 2nd place (1216 total)
        -2012 USAPL Longhorn Open
        198 Raw Mens Open, 1st place (1177 total)
        -2012 USAPL Aggie Showdown
        198lb Raw Mens Open, 2nd place (1137 total)

        Comment


        • #5
          will likely be trying this in a while, maybe with straight sets on accessory ...
          Overtraining should be one of the lowest concerns. You should focus on optimal training.
          -John Ceasar

          Comment


          • #6
            Be creative for what your goals are.
            International Elite Raw Powerlifter
            Blood - Sweat - Chalk

            Comment


            • #7
              Just read it, and it's an awesome body of work. Overall well put together, and almost identical to how I've been training; focusing on big lifts, assistance to suit you individually, etc. etc.


              The only thing is, timing of meals has no impact on the overall results of an individual. The more and more we learn about nutrition, research progresses, etc. etc. the more we realize that timing of meals is really just a myth and that the macros, and daily intake is what matters.

              This might seem a bit "extreme" to everyone, but I can post some interesting artciesl, etc. etc. to support this craziness.
              Don't ask for a light load, but a strong back.

              5% Discount at TP.com: DEG907

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by DaveGabe24 View Post
                Just read it, and it's an awesome body of work. Overall well put together, and almost identical to how I've been training; focusing on big lifts, assistance to suit you individually, etc. etc.


                The only thing is, timing of meals has no impact on the overall results of an individual. The more and more we learn about nutrition, research progresses, etc. etc. the more we realize that timing of meals is really just a myth and that the macros, and daily intake is what matters.

                This might seem a bit "extreme" to everyone, but I can post some interesting artciesl, etc. etc. to support this craziness.
                not to derail the thread, and I find the bolded statement to be mostly true... but... If I go eat a bucket of taco bell before I train, Im not going to have a good training session, and then my overall results will suffer.... So timing does have some merit....

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by thetim View Post
                  not to derail the thread, and I find the bolded statement to be mostly true... but... If I go eat a bucket of taco bell before I train, Im not going to have a good training session, and then my overall results will suffer.... So timing does have some merit....
                  Ok yah, to those extremes I'll agree. I just wanted to add that for everyone out their going OCD about the "anabolic window", etc. etc. It won't make or break you if your scheduled meal gets pushed back an hour or two or three.

                  But yeah, you have to be reasonable if you do eat before/after
                  Don't ask for a light load, but a strong back.

                  5% Discount at TP.com: DEG907

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DaveGabe24 View Post
                    Just read it, and it's an awesome body of work. Overall well put together, and almost identical to how I've been training; focusing on big lifts, assistance to suit you individually, etc. etc.


                    The only thing is, timing of meals has no impact on the overall results of an individual. The more and more we learn about nutrition, research progresses, etc. etc. the more we realize that timing of meals is really just a myth and that the macros, and daily intake is what matters.

                    This might seem a bit "extreme" to everyone, but I can post some interesting artciesl, etc. etc. to support this craziness.
                    Fire 'em up - I would love to read them!

                    -Scott
                    The Book Has Arrived!
                    The Book Has Arrived!

                    Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a pristine, well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, used up, worn out, and shouting, "Holy #$&^%$^... What a ride!!!"


                    www.TrueNutrition.com

                    2012 NPC Master's Nationals HW 5th. Mid-USA HW & Overall
                    2010 NPC Jr. USA HW 4th, Pacific USA Heavy 2nd
                    2009 NPC Mr. Arizona HW & Overall, Jr. Nationals HW 16th, Smoked at USA's

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by homonunculus View Post
                      Fire 'em up - I would love to read them!

                      -Scott
                      Uh oh, shit just got real.
                      Ph.D., Theoretical Physics '16
                      kind of a douche

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Sammich View Post
                        Uh oh, shit just got real.
                        Lol...I'm not trying to stir anything up and if Homon can shed further light and help me to realize otherwise I'm all for it. I'm not one to be "set" in my ways and realize that science constantly disproves itself as it evolves. The beauty of having a biology degree is realizing that there's no absolute truths in anything, and unfortunately the majority of research done is not free of bias.

                        Here's an excerpt from Alan Aragon's post on Iron Addicts regarding nutrient timing:

                        The postexercise "anabolic window" is a highly misused & abused concept (which I believe Layne agrees with). Preworkout nutrition all but cancels the urgency, unless you're an endurance athlete with multiple glycogen-depleting events in a single day. Getting down to brass tacks, a relatively recent study (Power et al. 2009) showed that a 45g dose of whey protein isolate takes appx 50 minutes to cause blood AA levels to peak. Resulting insulin levels, which peaked at 40 minutes after ingestion, remained at elevations known to max out the inhibition of muscle protein breakdown (15-30 mU/L) for 120 minutes after ingestion. This dose takes 3 hours for insulin & AA levels to return to baseline from the point of ingestion. The inclusion of carbs to this dose would cause AA & insulin levels to peak higher & stay elevated above baseline even longer.

                        So much for the anabolic peephole & the urgency to down AAs during your weight training workout; they are already seeping into circulation (& will continue to do so after your training bout is done). Even in the event that a preworkout meal is skipped, the anabolic effect of the postworkout meal is increased as a supercompensatory response (Deldicque et al, 2010). Moving on, another recent study (Staples et al, 2010) found that a substantial dose of carbohydrate (50g maltodextrin) added to 25g whey protein was unable to further increase postexercise net muscle protein balance compared to the protein dose without carbs. Again, this is not to say that adding carbs at this point is counterproductive, but it certainly doesn't support the idea that you must get your lightning-fast postexercise carb orgy for optimal results.

                        Sorry about the length of this post, I tried to keep it concise, but sh!t happens. I might not be able to come on for a while (the weekend calls). And by the way, there are even more compelling data against the standard practice of neurotic micromanagement of meal timing, but it's not my intention to write a book here.
                        and one more post from Alan:

                        Hierarchy of Importance

                        When speaking of nutrition for improving body composition or training performance, it's crucial to realize there's an underlying hierarchy of importance. At the top of the hierarchy is total amount of the macronutrients by the end of the day. Distantly below that is the precise timing of those nutrients. With very few exceptions, athletes and active individuals eat multiple times per day. Thus, the majority of their day is spent in the postprandial (fed) rather than a post-absorptive (fasted) state. The vast majority of nutrient timing studies have been done on overnight-fasted subjects put through glycogen depletion protocols, which obviously limits the applicability of the outcomes. Pre-exercise (and/or during-exercise) nutrient intake often has a lingering carry-over effect into the post-exercise period. Throughout the day, there's a constant overlap of meal digestion & nutrient absorption. For this reason, the effectiveness of nutrient timing does not require a high degree of precision.

                        The Primary Laws of Nutrient Timing
                        • * The First Law of Nutrient Timing is: hitting your daily macronutrient targets is FAR more important than nutrient timing.
                          * The Second Law of Nutrient Timing is: hitting your daily macronutrient targets is FAR more important than nutrient timing.

                        Just wanted to make the point that hitting your numbers in the grand scheme is far more important than feeling the need to chug a shake the very second your last set ends.

                        Definitely open for people to refute this though, I'm all for quality discussions and debates.
                        Don't ask for a light load, but a strong back.

                        5% Discount at TP.com: DEG907

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Ha. No one made an extremes like that. The workout window is well documented. Feel free to search for it.

                          And i think calling it "craziness" is quite extreme.
                          International Elite Raw Powerlifter
                          Blood - Sweat - Chalk

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Sammich View Post
                            Uh oh, shit just got real.
                            :runaway:

                            rofl, I havent heard that in a while.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by DaveGabe24 View Post
                              The only thing is, timing of meals has no impact on the overall results of an individual. The more and more we learn about nutrition, research progresses, etc. etc. the more we realize that timing of meals is really just a myth and that the macros, and daily intake is what matters.
                              Originally posted by DaveGabe24 View Post

                              Here's an excerpt from Alan Aragon's post on Iron Addicts regarding nutrient timing:

                              The postexercise "anabolic window" is a highly misused & abused concept (which I believe Layne agrees with). Preworkout nutrition all but cancels the urgency,
                              and one more post from Alan:

                              The Primary Laws of Nutrient Timing

                              * The First Law of Nutrient Timing is: hitting your daily macronutrient targets is FAR more important than nutrient timing.
                              * The Second Law of Nutrient Timing is: hitting your daily macronutrient targets is FAR more important than nutrient timing.

                              Just wanted to make the point that hitting your numbers in the grand scheme is far more important than feeling the need to chug a shake the very second your last set ends. .
                              I agree that the overall diet is numero uno (Alan's sarcasm aside).

                              However he says that pre-workout nutrition is important, but I'm not sure what he means by that. (Does he mean the meal or days' meals that happens to be before training or a meal / shake taken in just before training). You however say that meal timing has NO impact. Depending on what Alan mean, he might be contradicting, rather that supporting the issue of timing. (I wonder if Alan means that if you have an immediately pre-workout "meal" then the need to hurry up with a post-workout meal is greatly lessened. This is substantially different than saying that timing does not matter.)

                              I'll just quote myself on this one (from an article in Musclemag that was out a couple months ago). These paragraphs cut to the chase of the most direct, "real world" applicable data. (The work of Phillips, Tipton and others that are indirectly supportive of a nutrient timing effect are covered in the rest of the article.) ("RS" = Recovery Supplement):

                              Employing a dextrose only placebo for comparison, Willoughby et al. found that a simple RS, containing only 20g of protein (a blend of whey, milk isolate and casein) had a pronounced anabolic effect when consumed both 1 hour before and immediately after exercise. Muscle mass and strength were enhanced by the protein consumption, which also elevated blood (systemic) levels and local muscle expression of IGF-1(1), an anabolic hormone and growth factor that directs whole body(2) and local muscle growth(3). Its important to note that the RS did not affect overall intake of carbohydrate, protein or calories in either group: It was the nutrient timing of only 40g of protein per day (4x / week on training days only) that roughly doubled the gains in fat-free mass, thigh volume (indicative of thigh muscle mass), as well as bench and leg press strength(1).

                              Cribb and Hayes(4) used a similar design, with even more impressive results. They employed a simple RS, this one containing (for a ~200lb bodybuilder) 32g whey isolate, 32 grams of carbs and 6 g creatine monohydrate, which was taken on training days only (4 days / week), split evenly over pre- and post-exercise doses. To put the nutrient timing principle to the test, their control group actually consumed the same RS, but in the morning and evening, several hours before or after exercise. As in Willoughby’s study, daily macronutrient intake was not affected whatsoever by the supplement in either group of subjects. After 10 weeks of training, nutrient timing resulted ~50-100% greater gains in lean body mass, Type II muscle fiber growth, and strength in the squat and bench press. (The nutrient timing group even experienced significant fat loss!) These results are even more impressive considering the subjects were previously trained (>6 months) and also underwent 8-12 weeks of further resistance training familiarization to stabilize muscle mass and neural adaptations to the training protocol(5) before starting the study.


                              1. Willoughby, D.S., et al., Effects of resistance training and protein plus amino acid supplementation on muscle anabolism, mass, and strength. Amino Acids, 2007. 32(4): p. 467-77. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=16988909
                              2. Thissen, J.P., et al., Nutritional regulation of the insulin-like growth factors. Endocr Rev, 1994. 15(1): p. 80-101.
                              3. Adams, G., Role of IGF-I in the regulation of skeletal muscle. Exerc.Sport Sci.Rev, 1998. 26: p. 37-60.
                              4. Cribb, P.J. and A. Hayes, Effects of supplement timing and resistance exercise on skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 2006. 38(11): p. 1918-25. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=17095924
                              5. Moritani, T. and H.A. deVries, Neural factors versus hypertrophy in the time course of muscle strength gain. Am J Phys Med, 1979. 58(3): p. 115-30.
                              -Scott
                              The Book Has Arrived!
                              The Book Has Arrived!

                              Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a pristine, well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, used up, worn out, and shouting, "Holy #$&^%$^... What a ride!!!"


                              www.TrueNutrition.com

                              2012 NPC Master's Nationals HW 5th. Mid-USA HW & Overall
                              2010 NPC Jr. USA HW 4th, Pacific USA Heavy 2nd
                              2009 NPC Mr. Arizona HW & Overall, Jr. Nationals HW 16th, Smoked at USA's

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X