Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Open challenge to all IM members....

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Open challenge to all IM members....

    I challenge any one of you to define clearly what the difference is between a fruit and a berry.

    I have searched the hell out of the internet and nothing seems consistent at all.

    By the way, a grape is a berry. So is an orange and a watermelon but a blueberry is a "false" berry - technically, not a berry at all.
    Just a little headstart for you. : )

    First one to get this completely clarified will get a huge IM pat on the back from me, personally.

    Skip


    Facebook: Skip Hill
    Instagram: @intensemuscle
    YouTube: TEAMSKIP
    TikTok: @intensemuscle


    For Training Inquiries: [email protected]

    Use discount code "SKIP" and get your TEAM SKIP protein here: www.TrueNutrition.com/TEAMSKIPblend

  • #2
    Skip,

    You're a fruit...

    Inhuman's a big snuggly beary...

    What do I win?...

    -R
    The Book Has Arrived!
    The Book Has Arrived!

    Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a pristine, well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, used up, worn out, and shouting, "Holy #$&^%$^... What a ride!!!"


    www.TrueNutrition.com

    2012 NPC Master's Nationals HW 5th. Mid-USA HW & Overall
    2010 NPC Jr. USA HW 4th, Pacific USA Heavy 2nd
    2009 NPC Mr. Arizona HW & Overall, Jr. Nationals HW 16th, Smoked at USA's

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by homonunculus
      Skip,

      You're a fruit...

      Inhuman's a big snuggly beary...

      What do I win?...

      -R
      *PPPPPFFFFFTTTTTttttt* (coffee spit out on screen)

      LMAO!!!!!!!
      -KidRok-
      "...because I won't accept that I can't."


      www.https://Truenutrition.com/
      5% OFF with Discount Code "FXL222"

      https://www.facebook.com/hopsfitnessxl

      Comment


      • #4
        Fruit's Like Berries?

        Actually I believe it has to do with the fact that fruits carry their seeds inside and berries carry them outside.
        Lift big 2 get big
        TrueProtein.com Use discount code ctg001 for additional savings on already great prices
        mod at bodybuilding.com
        mod at iron-forum.com
        mod at melanoplanet.com

        Obesity related illness will account for more than 1/2 of all health care costs in the next few years.
        So why is the damn government waging war on the FITNESS Industry??
        "Before you criticize someone, try walking a mile in their shoes.
        Because, then you're a mile away, AND you've got their shoes"

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by homonunculus
          Skip,

          You're a fruit...

          Inhuman's a big snuggly beary...

          What do I win?...

          -R

          you win for having funniest response!!!!
          "Well done is better than well said"

          :rocker:



          Comment


          • #6
            Berry interesting topic!!

            Doh !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
            The Phoenix Rising

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ctgblue

              Actually I believe it has to do with the fact that fruits carry their seeds inside and berries carry them outside.
              This was one of my theories as well but, nope, not it. I checked on it. Examples: watermelon is a berry, grape is a berry, oranges are considered a berry as well. No seeds on the outside for those.

              Skip


              Facebook: Skip Hill
              Instagram: @intensemuscle
              YouTube: TEAMSKIP
              TikTok: @intensemuscle


              For Training Inquiries: [email protected]

              Use discount code "SKIP" and get your TEAM SKIP protein here: www.TrueNutrition.com/TEAMSKIPblend

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by KidRok
                *PPPPPFFFFFTTTTTttttt* (coffee spit out on screen)

                LMAO!!!!!!!
                Yes, that is great, keep encouraging him.

                *shakes head*

                Skip


                Facebook: Skip Hill
                Instagram: @intensemuscle
                YouTube: TEAMSKIP
                TikTok: @intensemuscle


                For Training Inquiries: [email protected]

                Use discount code "SKIP" and get your TEAM SKIP protein here: www.TrueNutrition.com/TEAMSKIPblend

                Comment


                • #9
                  Aren't all berries fruit?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bellina
                    Aren't all berries fruit?
                    Yes, all berries are fruit. The problem is how do they classify which fruit is a berry and which is simply only a fruit? I really am stumped on this one.

                    Skip


                    Facebook: Skip Hill
                    Instagram: @intensemuscle
                    YouTube: TEAMSKIP
                    TikTok: @intensemuscle


                    For Training Inquiries: [email protected]

                    Use discount code "SKIP" and get your TEAM SKIP protein here: www.TrueNutrition.com/TEAMSKIPblend

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Skip
                      Yes, all berries are fruit. The problem is how do they classify which fruit is a berry and which is simply only a fruit? I really am stumped on this one.

                      Skip
                      Here ya go:

                      Fruits are classified according to the arrangement from which they derive. There are four types—simple, aggregate, multiple, and accessory fruits. Simple fruits develop from a single ovary of a single flower and may be fleshy or dry. Principal fleshy fruit types are the berry, in which the entire pericarp is soft and pulpy (e.g., the grape, tomato, banana, pepo, hesperidium, and blueberry) and the drupe, in which the outer layers may be pulpy, fibrous, or leathery and the endocarp hardens into a pit or stone enclosing one or more seeds (e.g., the peach, cherry, olive, coconut, and walnut). The name fruit is often applied loosely to all edible plant products and specifically to the fleshy fruits, some of which (e.g., eggplant, tomatoes, and squash) are commonly called vegetables. Dry fruits are divided into those whose hard or papery shells split open to release the mature seed (dehiscent fruits) and those that do not split (indehiscent fruits). Among the dehiscent fruits are the legume (e.g., the pod of the pea and bean), which splits at both edges, and the follicle, which splits on only one side (e.g., milkweed and larkspur); others include the dry fruits of the poppy, snapdragon, lily, and mustard. Indehiscent fruits include the single-seeded achene of the buttercup and the composite flowers; the caryopsis (grain); the nut (e.g., acorn and hazelnut); and the fruits of the carrot and parsnip (not to be confused with their edible fleshy roots).

                      An aggregate fruit (e.g., blackberry and raspberry) consists of a mass of small drupes (drupelets), each of which developed from a separate ovary of a single flower. A multiple fruit (e.g., pineapple and mulberry) develops from the ovaries of many flowers growing in a cluster. Accessory fruits contain tissue derived from plant parts other than the ovary; the strawberry is actually a number of tiny achenes (miscalled seeds) outside a central pulpy pith that is the enlarged receptacle or base of the flower. The core of the pineapple is also receptacle (stem) tissue. The best-known accessory fruit is the pome (e.g., apple and pear), in which the fleshy edible portion is swollen stem tissue and the true fruit is the central core. The skin of the banana is also stem tissue, as is the rind of the pepo (berrylike fruit) of the squash, cucumber, and melon.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by homonunculus
                        Skip,

                        You're a fruit...

                        Inhuman's a big snuggly beary...

                        What do I win?...

                        -R

                        Awwww man!
                        SweatMachine
                        (pronounced: Swet-Mow-Sheen)

                        That which we manifest lies before us.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Thors
                          Here ya go:

                          Fruits are classified according to the arrangement from which they derive. There are four types—simple, aggregate, multiple, and accessory fruits. Simple fruits develop from a single ovary of a single flower and may be fleshy or dry. Principal fleshy fruit types are the berry, in which the entire pericarp is soft and pulpy (e.g., the grape, tomato, banana, pepo, hesperidium, and blueberry) and the drupe, in which the outer layers may be pulpy, fibrous, or leathery and the endocarp hardens into a pit or stone enclosing one or more seeds (e.g., the peach, cherry, olive, coconut, and walnut). The name fruit is often applied loosely to all edible plant products and specifically to the fleshy fruits, some of which (e.g., eggplant, tomatoes, and squash) are commonly called vegetables. Dry fruits are divided into those whose hard or papery shells split open to release the mature seed (dehiscent fruits) and those that do not split (indehiscent fruits). Among the dehiscent fruits are the legume (e.g., the pod of the pea and bean), which splits at both edges, and the follicle, which splits on only one side (e.g., milkweed and larkspur); others include the dry fruits of the poppy, snapdragon, lily, and mustard. Indehiscent fruits include the single-seeded achene of the buttercup and the composite flowers; the caryopsis (grain); the nut (e.g., acorn and hazelnut); and the fruits of the carrot and parsnip (not to be confused with their edible fleshy roots).

                          An aggregate fruit (e.g., blackberry and raspberry) consists of a mass of small drupes (drupelets), each of which developed from a separate ovary of a single flower. A multiple fruit (e.g., pineapple and mulberry) develops from the ovaries of many flowers growing in a cluster. Accessory fruits contain tissue derived from plant parts other than the ovary; the strawberry is actually a number of tiny achenes (miscalled seeds) outside a central pulpy pith that is the enlarged receptacle or base of the flower. The core of the pineapple is also receptacle (stem) tissue. The best-known accessory fruit is the pome (e.g., apple and pear), in which the fleshy edible portion is swollen stem tissue and the true fruit is the central core. The skin of the banana is also stem tissue, as is the rind of the pepo (berrylike fruit) of the squash, cucumber, and melon.
                          Well, I am impressed to say the least. This is exactly what I was looking for and simply could not come up with. However, I don't understand a God damned word above and feel no more educated on the topic than before I read it. lol

                          I am going to read it over and check a couple difinitions of words to hopefully understand it completely. In the meantime, if someone could put this into lay man's terms for me, I would appreciate it. I am simply not that bright, articulate, intelligent, etc., etc....



                          Skip


                          Facebook: Skip Hill
                          Instagram: @intensemuscle
                          YouTube: TEAMSKIP
                          TikTok: @intensemuscle


                          For Training Inquiries: [email protected]

                          Use discount code "SKIP" and get your TEAM SKIP protein here: www.TrueNutrition.com/TEAMSKIPblend

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            You have too much time on your hands my friend.....................

                            "Beneath all suffering.........lies the beauty of opportunity"



                            Comment


                            • #15
                              This is absolutely correct. lol

                              Skip


                              Facebook: Skip Hill
                              Instagram: @intensemuscle
                              YouTube: TEAMSKIP
                              TikTok: @intensemuscle


                              For Training Inquiries: [email protected]

                              Use discount code "SKIP" and get your TEAM SKIP protein here: www.TrueNutrition.com/TEAMSKIPblend

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X