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  • Experience with home gyms?

    I've got a friend wanting to get a home gym. I recommended against getting a Bowflex because of the wacky strength curve induced by elastic resistance.

    Does anyone know of good home gyms that use selectorized weight stacks? I was looking at this category on Amazon:
    Weight stack home gyms
    Ph.D., Theoretical Physics '16
    kind of a douche

  • #2
    Would he be opposed to leverage equipment like this?

    http://www.bodysolid.com/Home/SBL460...t_Leverage_Gym

    Powertec also has one
    They got pretty good deals on the ones I looked at jus now
    I jus googled "leverage home gyms"
    If you or him wanted to see the other options
    I see you didn't take a s#!t before deadlifting....
    I too like to live dangerously

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    • #3
      What about those smith-machine, half-rack combos? They could be a good option took, perhaps.

      Comment


      • #4
        Sammich,

        This is a tough thing to help someone with without knowing lifting experience, which I think will dictate the likelihood that he will keep with it and what kind of equipment makes sense for him.

        Price range would dramatically narrow things down, too.

        Whenever possible, I suggest folks look at craigslist - there are TONS of pieces that will save a lot of money. I have the strong suspicion that very few people can maintain a lifting regimen at home for very long. Typical adherence to new exercise programs is about 10% at the 1 year mark and without social support of a gym I'd not be surprised if it's less with home units. (The advantage of a reduced "barrier to action" - the gym is right there at home doesn't seem to necessarily outweigh the fact that most folks simply don't like lifting at home alone, IME.)

        -S
        The Book Has Arrived!
        The Book Has Arrived!

        Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a pristine, well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, used up, worn out, and shouting, "Holy #$&^%$^... What a ride!!!"


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        2012 NPC Master's Nationals HW 5th. Mid-USA HW & Overall
        2010 NPC Jr. USA HW 4th, Pacific USA Heavy 2nd
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        • #5
          I am a home gym guy and have a home built power rack, 3 benches, 3 long bars and a heap of garage sale weights, dumb bells etc..

          Sometimes I go to the gym for a few months but then all the people sitting on machines texting and face booking gets to me and I only train at home again. I feel the versatility of a simple rack with some minor mods is high.

          I would be a gym user no matter what but when I had kids then a home gym became a must.

          Quads is likely the only body group a bit lacking with only having squat variations plus leg extensions and weighted dip belt squats but hey if you can't build legs with squats.
          "Be gentle in what you do, firm in how you do it."
          Buck Brannaman.

          "It is the certainty of punishment that deters crime, not the severity of it."
          'Hanging' Judge PARKER

          "Nothing is so powerful as an insight into human nature... what compulsions drive a man, what instincts dominate his action... if you know these things about a man you can touch him at the core of his being."
          ~William Bernbach

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          • #6
            Totally agree with last three posts. I've spent most of my training time at home. Keep eye out on craigs list. A power rack is a must, lot's of versatility in just that. Squats, bench press, barbell curls, pullups, etc.
            Also the "play it again" sports places that give people money for their turn in gym equipment.
            Those all in one gyms that are new, are expensive, and they don't look all that great, or even necessary.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by homonunculus View Post
              Sammich,

              This is a tough thing to help someone with without knowing lifting experience, which I think will dictate the likelihood that he will keep with it and what kind of equipment makes sense for him.

              Price range would dramatically narrow things down, too.

              Whenever possible, I suggest folks look at craigslist - there are TONS of pieces that will save a lot of money. I have the strong suspicion that very few people can maintain a lifting regimen at home for very long. Typical adherence to new exercise programs is about 10% at the 1 year mark and without social support of a gym I'd not be surprised if it's less with home units. (The advantage of a reduced "barrier to action" - the gym is right there at home doesn't seem to necessarily outweigh the fact that most folks simply don't like lifting at home alone, IME.)

              -S
              Ah, sorry, that didn't occur to me. He has zero lifting experience, will definitely keep up with it. Lowering the opportunity cost of lifting weights is exactly why he's getting it. His price range is in the $500-1000 realm.
              Ph.D., Theoretical Physics '16
              kind of a douche

              Comment


              • #8
                No need to reinvent the wheel. Look at some of the physiques of old built on nothing buy free weights mostly. I would rather have $1000 worth of various old school free weight equipment, than $1K of a selectorized plate "all" in one system.
                Is this gonna be exposed to the elements? He will be pretty angry when the rust starts appearing on new stuff.

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                • #9
                  With working 60+ hours per week, my 3 year old son and closes gym 35 miles away I found a power rack, barbell and 300lbs of plates is all I need. Matter of fact it has made me get in touch with OG push/pull workouts.

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                  • #10
                    Well, the problem with free weights is my friends has never lifted before. And if he's just wanting to do some light resistance training, he's better off with machines instead of dealing with the giant learning curve of free weights.
                    Ph.D., Theoretical Physics '16
                    kind of a douche

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Sammich View Post
                      He has zero lifting experience, will definitely keep up with it.

                      What does his current exercise routine look like?
                      #docswholift
                      PGY-1 FM
                      "No idea is above scrutiny and no people are beneath dignity." -Maajid Nawaz

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by nexa View Post
                        What does his current exercise routine look like?
                        Here is what he does on a daily basis:

                        1)
                        Ph.D., Theoretical Physics '16
                        kind of a douche

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Def could be cool to get the selectorized stuff for sure then
                          I see you didn't take a s#!t before deadlifting....
                          I too like to live dangerously

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Experience with home gyms?

                            Try a Bio Force. Better than a Bowflex of the cheaper range.
                            Works on gas compression. Small footprint. Selector use resistance etc..
                            I've got one in my arsenal. Great for a beginner and anyone else.

                            Also I've just had the Ironmaster Smith delivered a couple of months ago. Loving it, but leans towards the free weight side of things. Whever you use just the smith, or attachments for barbells etc.
                            Last edited by ChubChub; 10-19-2015, 07:58 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Sammich View Post
                              Well, the problem with free weights is my friends has never lifted before. And if he's just wanting to do some light resistance training, he's better off with machines instead of dealing with the giant learning curve of free weights.
                              I think the opposite with all due respect. I started moving free weights around at age 14. I think they recruit more fibers due to balancing and there is a freer range of motion.

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