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  • Integrating bodyweight training with weightlifting

    What I intend to do over the long term is integrate bodyweight training--muscle-ups, one-arm push-ups, handstand push-ups, flags, etc.--with bodybuilding. Does anybody here do this? Maybe it's crazy to try to work up to exercises like these at the same time as I'm deliberately getting heavier, but my lower back tortures me, and exercises like wall handstands and back bridges definitely help to alleviate the pain. I want my core to be strong enough and flexible enough to support me without trouble no matter how heavy I get.
    "Be kind, friendly and lenient towards your fellow man, but unrelenting and pitiless with yourself." -- Franz Bardon

  • #2
    Hey Blender man ... I've incorporated regular, tricep, and hand stand push ups at times and gotten some good results - my joints also felt better. I would just add a few sets of the appropriate version to the end of whatever workout I was doing (chest - standard push ups, delts - handstand, etc)

    I'm not doing them currently, but they are a great finisher IMO ... I wouldn't center my workouts around body weight stuff though,as it is inferior to hitting the weights from a bodybuilding standpoint (which you mentioned). I also think muscle ups and one arm push-ups fall more into the "circus trick" or skill category than something that is gonna build much muscle - impressive to watch but I question the payoff (again, IMO)

    But anything you can do to alleviate chronic pain is a "win"

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    • #3
      I like to Finish my shoulder wo with dips for 5 sets of amap. On my chest and tricep day I like to finish off with push-ups done rest pause style. Then i do the same on my knees for additional support .
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      • #4
        Thing is, I don't just want to use bodyweight exercises to supplement my lifting. I want to be able to do pistol squats, one-arm push-ups, etc. every bit as much as I want to have big muscles, and if that means I don't get *quite* as big and burly as I might otherwise, then I'm okay with that. I don't see why bodyweight exercises like these should prevent me from putting on mass, though. If I weigh 250 pounds and reach failure on pistol squats after 5 reps, why would you expect that to do anything except add more mass to my legs, assuming I'm not overtraining?
        "Be kind, friendly and lenient towards your fellow man, but unrelenting and pitiless with yourself." -- Franz Bardon

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        • #5
          Originally posted by BlenderManDan View Post
          Thing is, I don't just want to use bodyweight exercises to supplement my lifting. I want to be able to do pistol squats, one-arm push-ups, etc. every bit as much as I want to have big muscles, and if that means I don't get *quite* as big and burly as I might otherwise, then I'm okay with that. I don't see why bodyweight exercises like these should prevent me from putting on mass, though. If I weigh 250 pounds and reach failure on pistol squats after 5 reps, why would you expect that to do anything except add more mass to my legs, assuming I'm not overtraining?
          Maybe do a split each week dividing weight training and bodyweight training? I do something similar in my own workouts, but I do strength and speed training each week with the goal of doing a strength workout for each muscle and a speed workout for each muscle once each over the course of a week.

          In your case, you can do normal strength training lifts for each body part once a week, but instead of speed workouts, you could do bodyweight workouts.
          "If people were 1/10th as worried about the rest of their meals as they were about the post workout shake, there would be a hell of a lot more people looking like bodybuilders. "
          -Trop

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          • #6
            Simply toss it up in your routine like you would with a regular barbell exercise, no need to complicate it.

            Here's an example:

            Day 1 - Chest and Back
            - Bench
            - Dips
            - Weighted Push-Ups
            - Flys
            - One-Arm assisted Chins
            - Chest Supported Rows
            - Front Levers

            Day 2 - Legs
            - Squats
            - Front Squats
            - Pistol Squats
            - Russian Leg Curls
            - Planks


            Day 3 - Shoulder
            - OHP
            - Handstand Push-ups
            - Back Lever
            - Lateral Raises
            - Bent Laterals
            - Prisioner Rows

            Day 4 - Arms
            - Dips
            - Close-Grip Bench
            - Diamond Push-ups/One-arm pushups
            - Pushdowns
            - Hercules Chin-Ups
            - Barbell Curls
            - Preacher Curls
            - Lever or Leg Raises

            Day 5 - Back
            - Deadlift
            - Shrugs
            - Pull-Ups
            - Chin-ups
            - DB Rows
            - Single-arm pulldowns/towel pull-ups
            - Ab Wheel

            You have many options.

            If you need help programming your stuff concerning BW exercises, hit me up via PM and I'll help you figure something out.
            Last edited by 0001Delta; 12-18-2014, 02:39 PM.
            "If you're ready to do DC, you're not gonna give a flying f*(k about fatigue from the previous exercise. You get under the bar and kill it, each and every time." - homonunculus

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            • #7
              I just ordered Convict Conditioning and will be easing myself into it while continuing my present bodybuilding program. CC starts out extremely easy, from what I've read (you start by doing push-ups against a wall), so what I'm going to do at first is simply do both programs side-by-side. Gently doing push-ups against a wall seems to be aiding my recovery from my chest and shoulder workouts. Once I've progressed in CC to the point that I'm doing taxing exercises, I'll love any help integrating those with my weight training.
              "Be kind, friendly and lenient towards your fellow man, but unrelenting and pitiless with yourself." -- Franz Bardon

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