Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Effect of Strength Training on Liver Function Tests

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Effect of Strength Training on Liver Function Tests

    Just recently had bloodwork done and liver enzymes were shown to be elevated. Just had follow-up bloodwork done and will be working with my doctor to determine the cause, but decided to poke around a little bit and came across this study.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/arti...p0065-0253.pdf

    AIM
    To investigate the effect of intensive muscular exercise (weightlifting) on clinical chemistry parameters reflecting liver function in healthy men.

    METHODS
    Fifteen healthy men, used to moderate physical activity not including weightlifting, performed an 1 h long weightlifting programme. Blood was sampled for clinical chemistry parameters [aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LD), gamma-glutamyl transferase (gGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bilirubin, creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin] at repeated intervals during 7 days postexercise and at a follow-up examination 10–12 days postexercise.

    RESULTS
    Five out of eight studied clinical chemistry parameters (AST, ALT, LD, CK and myoglobin) increased significantly after exercise (P<0.01) and remained increased for at least 7 days postexercise. Bilirubin,gGT and ALP remained within the normal range.

    CONCLUSION
    The liver function parameters, AST and ALT, were significantly increased for at least 7 days after the exercise. In addition, LD and, in particular, CK and myoglobin showed highly elevated levels. These findings highlight
    the importance of imposing restrictions on weightlifting prior to and during clinical studies. Intensive muscular exercise, e.g. weightlifting, should also be considered as a cause of asymptomatic elevations of liver function tests in daily clinical practice

    Has anybody else had results like this where your liver enzymes have been found to be outside of the normal range? Curious if this is something commonly experienced with bodybuilders and other strength athletes.
    Last edited by moco; 08-13-2013, 10:58 AM.


    2017 NPC National Championships Classic Physique, Class D - 4th Place
    2017 NPC New England Championships Classic Physique, Class C - 1st Place
    2017 NPC East Coast Cup Classic Physique, Tall Class - 1st Place & Overall
    2015 Arnold Amateur Men's Classic Bodybuilding, Tall Class - 4th Place
    2013 NPC Europa Battle of Champions - 1st Place Novice Heavyweight, 2nd Place Open Light-Heavyweight



  • #2
    IME, it's unusual for someone in hard training to not have at least AST (sometimes ALT) elevated beyond the upper normal limit.

    Doc won't believe you in some cases, so you may have to bring in that study. (Been down this road before...)

    -S
    The Book Has Arrived!
    The Book Has Arrived!

    Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a pristine, well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, used up, worn out, and shouting, "Holy #$&^%$^... What a ride!!!"


    www.TrueNutrition.com

    2012 NPC Master's Nationals HW 5th. Mid-USA HW & Overall
    2010 NPC Jr. USA HW 4th, Pacific USA Heavy 2nd
    2009 NPC Mr. Arizona HW & Overall, Jr. Nationals HW 16th, Smoked at USA's

    Comment


    • #3
      Not to be off-base but either Dante or MassiveG have wrote that to get a more accurate blood test to stop supplements 2-weeks or so and working out 1-week or so before taking blood tests.
      SAVE 5-10% @ TRUENUTRITION.com Use code: LG100

      - Success is the best revenge

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by homonunculus View Post
        IME, it's unusual for someone in hard training to not have at least AST (sometimes ALT) elevated beyond the upper normal limit.

        Doc won't believe you in some cases, so you may have to bring in that study. (Been down this road before...)

        -S

        Interesting. I probably would've had some assumptions in the back of my mind too depending on how elevated it is.

        But what do I know, I'm just second year! :runaway:
        #docswholift
        PGY-1 FM
        "No idea is above scrutiny and no people are beneath dignity." -Maajid Nawaz

        Comment


        • #5
          Yes, my liver enzymes are always slightly high, usually around the upper limits or a little over. I wasn't aware of how exercise affects liver enzymes until I talked with Scott about it.
          My Doctor is aware of it as well but I never inquired with him about it, but he will ask me when was the last time I trained if the liver levels are a little high. The pattern is consistent in all of my bloodwork and when I had the stomach issues going on they did some medical imaging of my liver and it was perfectly healthy.
          Be true to yourself and fuel your body with nothing less the highest quality supplements. Only available at TrueNutrition.com Use discount code: KSP945 to save 5% on your order!

          Stickies...just read the damn stickies...

          2014 Xcalibur Cup Bantam Open - 1st
          2014 Tracey Greenwood Classic Bantam Open - 1st
          2015 Beat Cancer!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by nexa View Post
            Interesting. I probably would've had some assumptions in the back of my mind too depending on how elevated it is.

            But what do I know, I'm just second year! :runaway:
            That's the thing...

            The basis of the use of Transaminases (AST and ALT) as liver function tests presumes that hepatocytic lysis is are the primary source of these enzymes in the blood. Docs know the CPK has different isoforms, but if you note that ALT and AST can also originate in skeletal muscle, this seems to create a problem.

            It's typically taught that AST can increase with muscle trauma so the leap to exercise doing the same isn't so great.

            I wouldn't be surprised if this is just a forgotten piece of info. that's often taught, but rare to see outside of the emergency room (heart attacks, auto accidents, etc.):

            http://www.hopkinsguides.com/hopkins...Liver_function

            "Increased AST: primary liver disease, acute myocardial infarction, muscle trauma and diseases, pancreatitis, intestinal surgery, burns, renal infarction, pulmonary embolism."

            -S
            The Book Has Arrived!
            The Book Has Arrived!

            Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a pristine, well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, used up, worn out, and shouting, "Holy #$&^%$^... What a ride!!!"


            www.TrueNutrition.com

            2012 NPC Master's Nationals HW 5th. Mid-USA HW & Overall
            2010 NPC Jr. USA HW 4th, Pacific USA Heavy 2nd
            2009 NPC Mr. Arizona HW & Overall, Jr. Nationals HW 16th, Smoked at USA's

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by homonunculus View Post
              That's the thing...

              The basis of the use of Transaminases (AST and ALT) as liver function tests presumes that hepatocytic lysis is are the primary source of these enzymes in the blood. Docs know the CPK has different isoforms, but if you note that ALT and AST can also originate in skeletal muscle, this seems to create a problem.

              It's typically taught that AST can increase with muscle trauma so the leap to exercise doing the same isn't so great.

              I wouldn't be surprised if this is just a forgotten piece of info. that's often taught, but rare to see outside of the emergency room (heart attacks, auto accidents, etc.):

              http://www.hopkinsguides.com/hopkins...Liver_function

              "Increased AST: primary liver disease, acute myocardial infarction, muscle trauma and diseases, pancreatitis, intestinal surgery, burns, renal infarction, pulmonary embolism."

              -S

              Ah yes. The MI and skeletal mm + AST sound vaguely familiar from '09 pathophys. We haven't hit the liver yet.
              #docswholift
              PGY-1 FM
              "No idea is above scrutiny and no people are beneath dignity." -Maajid Nawaz

              Comment

              Working...
              X