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Nightwork and fatigue bringing excellent results???

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  • Nightwork and fatigue bringing excellent results???

    I usually train at about 4pm as I just feel the best at this time and will very nearly always perform better. Morning sessions are usually ok but not great. I have noticed though that if I am doing night work on a 10pm to 6am, then sleep to 2pm, wake eat and train at 4pm I can do extraordinary training sessions.

    Month after month when I do night work my workouts excel. I might have hit my required reps, say 15 for bench (3 RP sets as per DC) the previous week so I go up 5lbs and instead of getting 15 total I manage 15, 7, 3 for a total of 25 or something ridiculous.

    Leg press is the biggest improver with 10kg jumps (22lbs) and going up 7 reps in a set. It often has this jump for every exercise for the entire workout.

    I wondered if it was because I can then eat till 6am the next morning but wouldn't that then hold true for a 8am workout if I got up at 6am, ate and then trained and ate all day?

    When on nights I get very fatigued and feel a bit numb and not so sharp when I first awaken. I feel groggy and dazed going into the workout, almost spaced out. This is because on the first night starting at 10pm I have been awake since 6am so I basically start the week being 8hrs sleep deprived. I wonder if my body's normal messages regarding muscle recruitment or rather the messages that tell you to hold back are somehow suppressed.

    In any case as I keep a detailed log and I can see it happen time and time again. After night work for a week I am at my peak when others at work are falling apart I am doing PR's and look bigger to the point people often notice.

    Any thoughts on why this could be? Sorry for the long post but it has bugged me for the last year.
    "Be gentle in what you do, firm in how you do it."
    Buck Brannaman.

    "It is the certainty of punishment that deters crime, not the severity of it."
    'Hanging' Judge PARKER

    "Nothing is so powerful as an insight into human nature... what compulsions drive a man, what instincts dominate his action... if you know these things about a man you can touch him at the core of his being."
    ~William Bernbach

  • #2
    :overana:



    On a side note, no idea what your talking about. :playball:
    :preach:

    Comment


    • #3
      If I told you that was very helpful would you assist me further?
      "Be gentle in what you do, firm in how you do it."
      Buck Brannaman.

      "It is the certainty of punishment that deters crime, not the severity of it."
      'Hanging' Judge PARKER

      "Nothing is so powerful as an insight into human nature... what compulsions drive a man, what instincts dominate his action... if you know these things about a man you can touch him at the core of his being."
      ~William Bernbach

      Comment


      • #4
        Here's an overview of a study at the university of California in LA for the journal of physiology.

        http://mobile.nytimes.com/blogs/well...e-to-exercise/
        :preach:

        Comment


        • #5
          There's a good deal of lit. out there on this topic:

          Atkinson, G. and T. Reilly (1996). "Circadian variation in sports performance." Sports medicine 21(4): 292-312.
          Chronobiology is the science concerned with investigations of time-dependent changes in physiological variables. Circadian rhythms refer to variations that recur every 24 hours. Many physiological circadian rhythms at rest are endogenously controlled, and persist when an individual is isolated from environmental fluctuations. Unlike physiological variables, human performance cannot be monitored continuously in order to describe circadian rhythmicity. Experimental studies of the effect of circadian rhythms on performance need to be carefully designed in order to control for serial fatigue effects and to minimise disturbances in sleep. The detection of rhythmicity in performance variables is also highly influenced by the degree of test-retest repeatability of the measuring equipment. The majority of components of sports performance, e.g. flexibility, muscle strength, short term high power output, vary with time of day in a sinusoidal manner and peak in the early evening close to the daily maximum in body temperature. Psychological tests of short term memory, heart rate-based tests of physical fitness, and prolonged submaximal exercise performance carried out in hot conditions show peak times in the morning. Heart rate-based tests of work capacity appear to peak in the morning because the heart rate responses to exercise are minimal at this time of day. Post-lunch declines are evident with performance variables such as muscle strength, especially if measured frequently enough and sequentially within a 24-hour period to cause fatigue in individuals. More research work is needed to ascertain whether performance in tasks demanding fine motor control varies with time of day. Metabolic and respiratory rhythms are flattened when exercise becomes strenuous whilst the body temperature rhythm persists during maximal exercise. Higher work-rates are selected spontaneously in the early evening. At present, it is not known whether time of day influences the responses of a set training regimen (one in which the training stimulus does not vary with time of day) for endurance, strength, or the learning of motor skills. The normal circadian rhythms can be desynchronised following a flight across several time zones or a transfer to nocturnal work shifts. Although athletes show all the symptoms of 'jet lag' (increased fatigue, disturbed sleep and circadian rhythms), more research work is needed to identify the effects of transmeridian travel on the actual performances of elite sports competitors. Such investigations would need to be chronobiological, i.e. monitor performance at several times on several post-flight days, and take into account direction of travel, time of day of competition and the various performance components involved in a particular sport. Shiftwork interferes with participation in competitive sport, although there may be greater opportunities for shiftworkers to train in the hours of daylight for individual sports such as cycling and swimming. Studies should be conducted to ascertain whether shiftwork-mediated rhythm disturbances affect sports performance. Individual differences in performance rhythms are small but significant. Circadian rhythms are larger in amplitude in physically fit individuals than sedentary individuals. Athletes over 50 years of age tend to be higher in 'morningness', habitually scheduling relatively more training in the morning and selecting relatively higher work-rates during exercise compared with young athletes. These differences should be recognised by practitioners concerned with organising the habitual regimens of athletes.

          Baxter, C. and T. Reilly (1983). "Influence of time of day on all-out swimming." British journal of sports medicine 17(2): 122-127.
          The effect of time of day on all-out swim performances was examined. Fourteen subjects performed maximal front crawl swim tests on separate days over 100 m. and 400 m. at 5 different times of day between 06.30 h. and 22.00 h. Performance showed a significant linear trend with time of day in close though not exact association with the circadian rhythm in oral temperature: a goodness of fit test confirmed that the values predicted from linear trend analysis coincided with the measured values (p less than 0.05). The steady improvement throughout the day was 3.5% for 100 m. and 2.5% for 400 m. swims. Trunk flexibility displayed a time of day variation with a trough in the morning and a peak in the afternoon. No significant rhythm was observed in ankle and shoulder flexibility, grip strength or peak expiratory flow rate (p greater than 0.05). It was concluded that maximal swimming trials are best scheduled for the evening and worst in the early morning. Specific fitness factors cannot clearly account for the higher exercise capability in the evening which is strongly related to the circadian curve in body temperature.

          Drust, B., J. Waterhouse, et al. (2005). "Circadian rhythms in sports performance--an update." Chronobiology international 22(1): 21-44.
          We discuss current knowledge on the description, impact, and underlying causes of circadian rhythmicity in sports performance. We argue that there is a wealth of information from both applied and experimental work, which, when considered together, suggests that sports performance is affected by time of day in normal entrained conditions and that the variation has at least some input from endogenous mechanisms. Nevertheless, precise information on the relative importance of endogenous and exogenous factors is lacking. No single study can answer both the applied and basic research questions that are relevant to this topic, but an appropriate mixture of real-world research on rhythm disturbances and tightly controlled experiments involving forced desynchronization protocols is needed. Important issues, which should be considered by any chronobiologist interested in sports and exercise, include how representative the study sample and the selected performance tests are, test-retest reliability, as well as overall design of the experiment.

          Reilly, T. and B. Edwards (2007). "Altered sleep-wake cycles and physical performance in athletes." Physiology & behavior 90(2-3): 274-284.
          Sleep-waking cycles are fundamental in human circadian rhythms and their disruption can have consequences for behaviour and performance. Such disturbances occur due to domestic or occupational schedules that do not permit normal sleep quotas, rapid travel across multiple meridians and extreme athletic and recreational endeavours where sleep is restricted or totally deprived. There are methodological issues in quantifying the physiological and performance consequences of alterations in the sleep-wake cycle if the effects on circadian rhythms are to be separated from the fatigue process. Individual requirements for sleep show large variations but chronic reduction in sleep can lead to immuno-suppression. There are still unanswered questions about the sleep needs of athletes, the role of 'power naps' and the potential for exercise in improving the quality of sleep.

          Reilly, T. and J. Waterhouse (2009). "Sports performance: is there evidence that the body clock plays a role?" European journal of applied physiology 106(3): 321-332.
          Athletic performance shows a time-of-day effect, possible causes for which are environmental factors (which can be removed in laboratory studies), the sleep-wake cycle and the internal "body clock". The evidence currently available does not enable the roles of these last two factors to be separated. Even so, results indicate that the body clock probably does play some role in generating rhythms in sports performance, and that to deny this is unduly critical. Protocols to assess the separate roles of the body clock and time awake are then outlined. A serious impediment to experimental work is muscle fatigue, when maximal or sustained muscle exertion is required. Dealing with this problem can involve unacceptably prolonged protocols but alternatives which stress dexterity and eye-hand co-ordination exist, and these are directly relevant to many sports (shooting, for example). The review concludes with suggestions regarding the future value to sports physiology of chronobiological studies.

          Winget, C. M., C. W. DeRoshia, et al. (1985). "Circadian rhythms and athletic performance." Medicine and science in sports and exercise 17(5): 498-516.
          Daily or circadian rhythmical oscillations occur in several physiological and behavioral functions that contribute to athletic performance. These functions include resting levels of sensory motor, perceptual, and cognitive performance and several neuromuscular, behavioral, cardiovascular, and metabolic variables. In addition, circadian rhythms have been reported in many indices of aerobic capacity, in certain physiological variables at different exercise levels, and, in a few studies, in actual athletic performance proficiency. Circadian rhythmicity in components of athletic performance can be modulated by workload, psychological stressors, motivation, "morningness/eveningness" differences, social interaction, lighting, sleep disturbances, the "postlunch dip" phenomenon, altitude, dietary constituents, gender, and age. These rhythms can significantly influence performance depending upon the time of day at which the athletic endeavor takes place. Disturbance of circadian rhythmicity resulting from transmeridian flight across several time zones can result in fatigue, malaise, sleep disturbance, gastrointestinal problems, and performance deterioration in susceptible individuals (circadian dysrhythmia or "jet-lag"). Factors influencing the degree of impairment and duration of readaptation include direction of flight, rhythm synchronizer intensity, dietary constituents and timing of meals, and individual factors such as morningness/eveningness, personality traits, and motivation. It is the intent of the authors to increase awareness of circadian rhythmic influences upon physiology and performance and to provide a scientific data base for the human circadian system so that coaches and athletes can make reasonable decisions to reduce the negative impact of jet-lag and facilitate readaptation following transmeridian travel.

          -S
          The Book Has Arrived!
          The Book Has Arrived!

          Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a pristine, well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, used up, worn out, and shouting, "Holy #$&^%$^... What a ride!!!"


          www.TrueNutrition.com

          2012 NPC Master's Nationals HW 5th. Mid-USA HW & Overall
          2010 NPC Jr. USA HW 4th, Pacific USA Heavy 2nd
          2009 NPC Mr. Arizona HW & Overall, Jr. Nationals HW 16th, Smoked at USA's

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          • #6
            Thank you Dr Scott, you often put in more time than others to help with these things. I just find it very interesting to me that I increase my abilities rather than decrease when in a state that is clearly out of the natural rhythms. I read the above, most seem to indicate possible negative results from fatigue etc and not positive results. I will read more.

            Lifweights, thanks for helping also.
            "Be gentle in what you do, firm in how you do it."
            Buck Brannaman.

            "It is the certainty of punishment that deters crime, not the severity of it."
            'Hanging' Judge PARKER

            "Nothing is so powerful as an insight into human nature... what compulsions drive a man, what instincts dominate his action... if you know these things about a man you can touch him at the core of his being."
            ~William Bernbach

            Comment


            • #7
              SAHD,

              My suspicion is, like very typically found, you have best performances late afternoon. If you work over night, but sleep up until 2PM, you're rested for a late afternoon training session, at least relative to the rest of the day.

              In you case, the fatigue of the whacky shift work and being up al night is more than off-set, at least in terms of performance during a late afternoon workout b/c your body (autonomic nervous system) really prefers this time of day, and it so happens that you're just waking up and most rested then, too (during night shifts).

              (I address this in an article over on John Meadow's site, that some folks here might have read.)

              So, the better training stimulus and perhaps just generally working within a preferred diurnal cycle (generally, but NOT when you're shifted in and out of it b/c it obviously generates fatigue) means that you do well with a sleep all day, train afternoon, up all night kind of regimen. You could be just a natural night owl, so to speak.

              -S
              The Book Has Arrived!
              The Book Has Arrived!

              Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a pristine, well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, used up, worn out, and shouting, "Holy #$&^%$^... What a ride!!!"


              www.TrueNutrition.com

              2012 NPC Master's Nationals HW 5th. Mid-USA HW & Overall
              2010 NPC Jr. USA HW 4th, Pacific USA Heavy 2nd
              2009 NPC Mr. Arizona HW & Overall, Jr. Nationals HW 16th, Smoked at USA's

              Comment


              • #8
                That makes a great deal of sense. You should do a "Ask Dr Scott STEVENSON" Colum.
                "Be gentle in what you do, firm in how you do it."
                Buck Brannaman.

                "It is the certainty of punishment that deters crime, not the severity of it."
                'Hanging' Judge PARKER

                "Nothing is so powerful as an insight into human nature... what compulsions drive a man, what instincts dominate his action... if you know these things about a man you can touch him at the core of his being."
                ~William Bernbach

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by SAHD View Post
                  That makes a great deal of sense. You should do a "Ask Dr Scott STEVENSON" Colum.
                  LOL - I do! It's available at www.integrativebodybuilding.com for only a dime a day.

                  -S
                  The Book Has Arrived!
                  The Book Has Arrived!

                  Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a pristine, well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, used up, worn out, and shouting, "Holy #$&^%$^... What a ride!!!"


                  www.TrueNutrition.com

                  2012 NPC Master's Nationals HW 5th. Mid-USA HW & Overall
                  2010 NPC Jr. USA HW 4th, Pacific USA Heavy 2nd
                  2009 NPC Mr. Arizona HW & Overall, Jr. Nationals HW 16th, Smoked at USA's

                  Comment

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