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  • Foam rolling/mobility

    So i dont post here often because theres already so much info and really have just been trying to use it as tools in my regular gym rat training. that being said, how many people foam roll on a regular basis and whats your routine like? Ive been at it for the past three months and a fairly consistent basis with the overall goal of being able to do a deep overhead squat (not for progressive strength overload purposes but its just a badass exercise that really not alot of people can do). I roll everynight and usually one other time during the day but not really sure if im going about it the best way. I start with my t-spine and do several slow rolls and then stopping at 2-3 spots and "roll my body" over the roller. I'll then do the shoulder broomstick trick dante posted thats stickied as well as wall scapular slides where you put your back flat on the wall and do like a shoulder press your wrists and forearms (they'll want to move forward) pushing against the wall and up. This is my routine to fight the rounded shoulders/upper back (this really effects most of people due to all the hunched postures we are in daily and im curious to see how if a change in posture will make my lifts go up due to being in the better mechanical position dante talked about in a different sticky). I then go over my IT bands, inner quads, outer quads, adductors, hammies, hip flexors, and glutes fairly slowly and stopping and working certain sensitive areas for an extra 10-15 seconds. I also do the defranco agile 8 just about every day. So what's been other peoples results with foam rolling and any other tips youve had with it? (ive already done google search on this many times and came up with the routine i got but the knowledge/experience from this board really trumps a google search)

  • #2
    Well I'm far from the advanced trainees here, but I'm an advocate.

    Everything you mentioned makes its way into my routine, as well as the EFS band series for shoulder health.

    I use a PVC pipe, rumble roller and lax ball, but do basically the same progression as you do. I say keep doing what you're doing.

    My body tells me when I'm slacking... :/
    You're perfect, yes it's true. But without me...you're only you.

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    • #3
      Little off topic...
      @rage, pros/cons/opinion on rumble roller?
      Thanks
      Originally posted by thsfootball
      Stressing about what's catabolic- catabolic

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by daneoz View Post
        Little off topic...
        @rage, pros/cons/opinion on rumble roller?
        Thanks
        Absolutely love it. I prefer the aggressive manipulation, but sometimes I have to "warm up" with the PVC because the RR will heat up tender areas in a hurry. I got the black so I can't speak directly to the blue, but I'm very glad I bought it.

        It gets the knots out second only to ART or massage, IMO.
        You're perfect, yes it's true. But without me...you're only you.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by dcnewbie2010 View Post
          So i dont post here often because theres already so much info and really have just been trying to use it as tools in my regular gym rat training. that being said, how many people foam roll on a regular basis and whats your routine like? Ive been at it for the past three months and a fairly consistent basis with the overall goal of being able to do a deep overhead squat (not for progressive strength overload purposes but its just a badass exercise that really not alot of people can do). I roll everynight and usually one other time during the day but not really sure if im going about it the best way. I start with my t-spine and do several slow rolls and then stopping at 2-3 spots and "roll my body" over the roller. I'll then do the shoulder broomstick trick dante posted thats stickied as well as wall scapular slides where you put your back flat on the wall and do like a shoulder press your wrists and forearms (they'll want to move forward) pushing against the wall and up. This is my routine to fight the rounded shoulders/upper back (this really effects most of people due to all the hunched postures we are in daily and im curious to see how if a change in posture will make my lifts go up due to being in the better mechanical position dante talked about in a different sticky). I then go over my IT bands, inner quads, outer quads, adductors, hammies, hip flexors, and glutes fairly slowly and stopping and working certain sensitive areas for an extra 10-15 seconds. I also do the defranco agile 8 just about every day. So what's been other peoples results with foam rolling and any other tips youve had with it? (ive already done google search on this many times and came up with the routine i got but the knowledge/experience from this board really trumps a google search)
          As a caveat I do not DC. I am not sure if this is a "DC Thread" as this isn't the Doggpound, but anyways. I do foam roll every day both pre and post-exercise...strength training, cardio, whatever. But, I am also a super tight guy and need a lot of tissue work (I have been doing 4-5 days of strength training per week for over 15 years). In addition to the foam roller I also use a Tiger Tail on the lower leg, and a lacrosse ball on the feet, infraspinatus, pecs, and piriformis.

          -IT Band/Tensor Fasciae Latae
          -Quads
          -Hip Flexors
          -Adductors
          -Hamstrings
          -Lats
          -Pecs (ball)
          -Rhomboids
          -Thoracic Extension
          -Arches of Feet (ball)
          -Calves and peroneals (Tiger Tail)
          -Piriformis/Glutes (ball)
          -Infraspinatus (ball)

          In my opinion anyone that does a decent amount of long term term consistent resistance training typically requires some level of message therapy to maintain tissue health, break up adhesion, etc...not everyone, but most. Now, that's probably not necessary for a 20 year old with just a few years of training under their belt, but for a 30 year old with 10 years, yes. I think cumulative amount of training done is a factor. When foam rolling however, it's important to do more than just roll. It's effective by the principle of autogenic inhibition, which means it works to reduce the irritability of of the tissues. What you're looking do to is first roll up and down over the area, find the most sensitive spots, then just allow the pressure of you body to hold that position for a good 30 seconds and move onto the next sensitive part. If you do have a tightness or muscular imbalance post foam rolling is a particularly good time to then static stretch the tight areas and work on some isolated strengthening of the inhibited opposing muscle groups. But, I would not do too much static stretching prior to any heavy lifting.

          In regards to the shoulders I also think some attention typically needs to be paid to building thoracic mobility with some level of work either in a warmup or in between working sets during a workout to maintain posture. Also, a shoulder health program that consists of some level is isometric and dynamic endurance abduction work, strength work (which is typically handled by your back work by rows, shrugs, etc.), and proprioception work to maintain the health of the shoulder a few days per week is helpful. But that's better done post training as you don't want to fatigue the shoulder stabilization muscles prior to heavy loading requiring those muscles. To go with that I also believe in a core training program that focuses on the cores role to resist motion versus produce it. To do this I'd recommend anti-flexion, anti-rotation, and anti-lateral flexion (anti-extension is likely covered during resistance training) program. This I'd do post-warmup and pre-resistance work. If you want to build a deep OH squat you may also wish to spend some time working on dorsiflexion (bringing the toes upwards towards the shins) by stretching the ankle in both a straight and bent leg position and building hip mobility.

          Combine those 4 things together, tissue care, thoracic mobility work, a shoulder care program, and a core program that focuses on resisting motion should be a good start to reducing muscular imbalances and being able to maintain mobility and posture...assuming one's resistance program isn't creating dysfunction. But, every person has a unique situation and this topic could be a book by itself.
          Last edited by ; 03-10-2013, 10:31 AM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by daneoz View Post
            Little off topic...
            @rage, pros/cons/opinion on rumble roller?
            Thanks
            I don't think there's any cons to it. I feel that compared to the normal foam roller it does a better job. And you can still use it for thoracic mobility, etc.

            Plus the rumble roller looks like it can last longer than the average foam roller.


            The only downside is that the rumble roller hurts like hell, but it's a good pain
            "If you're ready to do DC, you're not gonna give a flying f*(k about fatigue from the previous exercise. You get under the bar and kill it, each and every time." - homonunculus

            "Nothing better than coming to IM and seeing a Wall of Text next to that big Tricep pic." - Lonnie123

            “Hateful to me as the gates of Hades is that man who hides one thing in his heart and speaks another.” - Homer

            The scale doesn't show a number. When he steps on it, it simply reads: Big Mother Fucker. - Skip

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            • #7
              I have a rumble roller too and I love it. When I first or it I used to get bruises from the little spikes. I only use it for my legs and just use a normal one at my gym for my upper body. It hurts like hell when I hit my IT bands. I also have a lacrosse ball that I use on my flutes chest and other areas that need something extra.
              "Only God can Judge me." -Tupac

              My Journal- http://www.intensemuscle.com/38062-eye-tiger.html

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              • #8
                I got the long black RR for Christmas this year and absolutely love it! It is pretty aggressive the first few times, but it feels great afterward and has really helped with recovery. It has held up way better than a normal foam roller so far as well. I would highly recommend it.
                "It is impossible to defeat an ignorant man in argument." -William G. McAdoo

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                • #9
                  Knickerbocker24

                  your posts are GOLD - saving a collection of your posts on my desktop - i really appreciate your contributions to this forum.

                  i started stretching + foam rolling everyday a couple of months ago to improve my mobility / flexibility - and to try to fix up nagging injuries and muscle imbalances (some which i still have).

                  After having done this for a few months - i cannot believe how underrated stretching/flexilbility/mobility is in bodybuilding circles.

                  i agree with your post - you have to do it constanttly (i.e. every day or every second day) to reap the benefits

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by wannagetbig View Post
                    Knickerbocker24

                    your posts are GOLD - saving a collection of your posts on my desktop - i really appreciate your contributions to this forum.
                    Thanks, glad you're finding it useful.

                    Originally posted by wannagetbig View Post
                    i started stretching + foam rolling everyday a couple of months ago to improve my mobility / flexibility - and to try to fix up nagging injuries and muscle imbalances (some which i still have).
                    If you care to open a thread & share I will try and help the best I can.

                    Originally posted by wannagetbig View Post
                    After having done this for a few months - i cannot believe how underrated stretching/flexilbility/mobility is in bodybuilding circles.
                    If you're a bb'er you probably enjoy grinding out moderately heavy lifts and probably hate the idea of doing flexibility, mobility, stability, etc. stuff. It's just not fun for the kind of people that like training to get big so it often gets put on the back-burner until something hurts. I hate it too, but I believe (and research backs it up) in it's value.

                    Originally posted by wannagetbig View Post
                    i agree with your post - you have to do it constanttly (i.e. every day or every second day) to reap the benefits
                    I really feel like cumulative damage is a big factor here. I haven't seen that younger athletes and the like need it, but I have found that bb'ers in their mid-20's & beyond do. Part of that has to do with the fact that bb'ers do way more volume of similar movements over and over and part due to their age and how many years training it takes to get the physiques they desire.

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                    • #11
                      a great resource i came across awhile back but forgot about was www.mobilitywod.com while it is crossfit oriented, it addresses just about every little issue you could think of in terms of mobility and getting your joints to work comfortably through a full ROM. its run by a licensed physical therapist and has a video with about every drill they recommend. honestly, my only issue with that site is there is sooo much info that it can turn into a paralysis by analysis type of thing

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