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EPOC of DC style training

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  • EPOC of DC style training

    The ability of resistance exercise to continue to burn calories beyond what is burned during the workout has been documented, but this particular study seems to show that rest/pause style training like DC does that job much, much better than other forms of lifting. Maybe Scott or someone else well-versed in reading these things can see if there were any flaws in their testing? Is it really THAT much better?

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3551736/

  • #2
    Originally posted by leegee38 View Post
    The ability of resistance exercise to continue to burn calories beyond what is burned during the workout has been documented, but this particular study seems to show that rest/pause style training like DC does that job much, much better than other forms of lifting. Maybe Scott or someone else well-versed in reading these things can see if there were any flaws in their testing? Is it really THAT much better?

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3551736/
    I'm not overly surprised by this outcome as it follows some of the same principles of high intensity interval style of conditioning work. For our purposes I like that they used resistance trained males as participants. One thing to look at is how many sets each group did of each exercise. The HIRT group did all sets on large muscle group exercises (bench, row, and leg press). Although the TT group also did bench, row, and leg press, they also did biceps curls, triceps extensions, leg curls, and sit ups. So, if they had done all their sets on only the large muscle group exercises would their EPOC have have been larger...only speculation there although I doubt it would still be as large as the HIRT group. Also, although these participants were moderately experienced strength populations, they were not experienced with the rest pause technique. This would make the rest pause a more novel stimulus to them which would likely cause a larger variation from homeostasis than the traditional strength program that they are more accustomed to, which would then require more adaptation and likely a larger EPOC response. So, would any novel high intensity training style cause the same effect? Finally, I think contraction velocity of movements would make a difference. Not all traditional strength workouts are performed with slow controlled rep tempos. I'm sure faster concentric velocities and slower eccentric ones would do more damage and impact EPOC more. Would it to the same degree as rest pause...I don't know.

    Keep in mind adaptations to exercise are specific to the type of training stimulus. So, they are indicating this style of training is basically efficient in that it hits multiple indicators of fitness at once...strength, muscle mass, metabolism, etc. Is efficiency something that speaks to you or would invest more time if you thought it was more beneficial even if it took you longer? Would this style of resistance training alone be better than say traditional strength training combined other forms of high intensity interval training for instance or even traditional resistance training combined with more lower intensity aerobic training? Further, is this style of training most beneficial for strength, power, and hypertrophy are some other things to consider?
    Last edited by ; 03-02-2013, 02:33 PM.

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    • #3
      I don't know if you guys have read Scott article on EPOC, but it is worth checking out: http://www.scottstevensonphd.com/336...2_16-10-18.pdf
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