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  • Cardio while bulking?

    I'm curious to know the reasoning or science behind doing cardio while bulking to reduce fat loss.

    Example:
    A: Intake 5000cals, do cardio and "burn" 300cals = 4700cals
    B: Intake 4700cals, no cardio and burn no cals = 4700cals

    At the end of the day what is the difference between they two?

    What would the benefit be for eating more cals, if your only going to expend them? Basically how do the cals that are being burned during cardio benefiting your bulk?

    I understand it's not as simple as it sounds, just curious to hear some educated opinions on the subject.
    My log: http://www.intensemuscle.com/showthread.php?t=47064

  • #2
    You dont think that cardio is beneficial to ramping up your metabolism, therefore allowing you to eat more calories? Obviously the heart health benefits go without saying....plus, for those who have a hard time getting alot of food down, it can help stimulate the appetite as well.....IMO, being more sedentary thru the day could have negative effects on the metabolism....

    And just for the record, I hate cardio and rarely do offseason cardio, but after my show I will be doing it regularly.....
    STEEL




    "SIMPLICITY, CONSISTENCY, INTENSITY"

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    • #3
      Originally posted by PBRevolution View Post
      I'm curious to know the reasoning or science behind doing cardio while bulking to reduce fat loss.

      Example:
      A: Intake 5000cals, do cardio and "burn" 300cals = 4700cals
      B: Intake 4700cals, no cardio and burn no cals = 4700cals

      At the end of the day what is the difference between they two?

      What would the benefit be for eating more cals, if your only going to expend them? Basically how do the cals that are being burned during cardio benefiting your bulk?

      I understand it's not as simple as it sounds, just curious to hear some educated opinions on the subject.
      Increase in appetite, increased blood flow = active recovery, better cardiovascular shape, to name a few.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by steel1970 View Post
        You dont think that cardio is beneficial to ramping up your metabolism, therefore allowing you to eat more calories? Obviously the heart health benefits go without saying....plus, for those who have a hard time getting alot of food down, it can help stimulate the appetite as well.....IMO, being more sedentary thru the day could have negative effects on the metabolism....

        And just for the record, I hate cardio and rarely do offseason cardio, but after my show I will be doing it regularly.....
        I can agree with appetite, I struggle to eat enough food toward then end of my bulk, but the slight increase in appetite from cardio will cause you have to eat even more cals at the end of the day then you would have otherwise.

        Definitely agree with you on heart health, I'm only 23 and my blood pressure gets insanely high when I bulk.

        Originally posted by Quadriceps View Post
        Increase in appetite, increased blood flow = active recovery, better cardiovascular shape, to name a few.
        Active recovery goes either way IMO. Better blood flow, but then cardio is slightly catabolic.

        Non off this answers the original question of minimizing fat gain though.



        Thanks for the responses so far.
        Last edited by PBRevolution; 06-03-2012, 02:21 PM.
        My log: http://www.intensemuscle.com/showthread.php?t=47064

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        • #5
          IMO, cardio should be kept in year round for the overall cardiovascular benefits. If you are able to more efficiently move blood, you are going to be able to transport oxygen and nutrients to your muscles faster, which will aid in recovery. I also think cardio performed year round aids in metabolic function, especially for those who have sedentary jobs.

          I would also speculate that it has a positive impact on blood pressure. *need to look up some studies so I can't confirm it without absolute certainty)

          Cardio also seems to help me with muscle soreness. I first found this out in High School as a baseball pitcher. My pitching coach told me to run one day after I logged a lot of innings because my arms was sore as hell from lactic acid buildup. After running, within several hours, the soreness began to dissipate.

          Now, after training hard, doing cardio seems to help with recovery and give a little relieve to the ridiculous muscle soreness after DC training sessions. After training legs, you can even just walk for 15 minutes or so to help with recovery (but this isn't really counted as cardio per se).

          I have a desk job and sit on my ass all day, without doing cardio I would probably be a fat turd.

          EDIT: Just saw your post.

          Although cardio is catabolic, isn't anything that does not aid is recovery and muscle building catabolic? THat is why your nutrition must be on point. In order to maximize muscle gains with minimal fa accumulation you have to balance both catabolic and anabolic states.

          You say minimizing fat loss? Why would you want to minimize fat loss? I would rather maximize fat loss while maximizing muscle growth. Or Maximize muscle growth with a little fat accumulation as possible.

          Cardio will allow to benefit from eating more kcals for recovery (and the nutrients will be utilized more effectively from cardio) and minimize fat gain due to having an elevated metabolism. As long as you are eating enough it will not hamper muscle growth.
          Last edited by mentalflex; 06-03-2012, 02:16 PM.
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          • #6
            There are no such things as "cutting" or "bulking".
            Ph.D., Theoretical Physics '16
            kind of a douche

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            • #7
              I meant to say "minimize fat gain", minimizing fat loss was a typo.

              Originally posted by mentalflex View Post
              Cardio will allow to benefit from eating more kcals for recovery (and the nutrients will be utilized more effectively from cardio) and minimize fat gain due to having an elevated metabolism. As long as you are eating enough it will not hamper muscle growth.
              I think the extra cals/nutrients are negated by the nature of cardio. But I will agree with you about how it elevates the metabolism.

              I know food consumption plays a large role in my blood pressure, it's much higher when I'm bulking which I assume is from higher sodium intake. I've ever done cardio on a regular basis (cut through diet alone), so I will have to see how that affects it.
              My log: http://www.intensemuscle.com/showthread.php?t=47064

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              • #8
                I think you will find that if you simply do low intensity cardio 3 times a week for a half an hour, you will stay leaner while gaining.....

                I think the benefits of adding it certainly are worth it. If you add it in and still don't gain, add in more food.....your body will respond more favorably to higher cals with the cardio in there. It's been proven countless times by many, many people....
                STEEL




                "SIMPLICITY, CONSISTENCY, INTENSITY"

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                • #9
                  Really good thread with a heap of info. I started getting lazy with cardio since I stopped sports, will add it back in.

                  Any preference? Hiit or liss? Or just whatever works for the person?
                  Originally posted by thsfootball
                  Stressing about what's catabolic- catabolic

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by PBRevolution View Post

                    Definitely agree with you on heart health, I'm only 23 and my blood pressure gets insanely high when I bulk.
                    I looked up some studies on cardiovascular health and blood pressure:

                    http://www.annals.org/content/136/7/493.full.pdf+html

                    Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Blood Pressure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Controlled Trials
                    Seamus P. Whelton; Ashley Chin, MPH, MA; Xue Xin, MD, MS; and Jiang He, MD, PhD

                    Abstract

                    Purpose: Physical activity has been associated with reduced blood pressure in observational epidemiologic studies and individual clinical trials. This meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials was conducted to determine the effect of aerobic exercise on blood pressure.

                    Data Sources: English-language articles published before September 2001.

                    Study Selection: 54 randomized, controlled trials (2419 participants) whose intervention and control groups differed only in aerobic exercise.

                    Data Extraction: Using a standardized protocol and data extraction form, three of the investigators independently abstracted data on study design, sample size, participant characteristics, type of intervention, follow-up duration, and treatment outcomes.

                    Data Synthesis: In a random-effects model, data from each trial were pooled and weighted by the inverse of the total variance. Aerobic exercise was associated with a significant reduction in mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure (−3.84 mm Hg [95% CI, −4.97 to −2.72 mm Hg] and −2.58 mm Hg [CI, −3.35 to −1.81 mm Hg], respectively). A reduction in blood pressure was associated with aerobic exercise in hypertensive participants and normotensive participants and in overweight participants and normal-weight participants.

                    Conclusions: Aerobic exercise reduces blood pressure in both hypertensive and normotensive persons. An increase in aerobic physical activity should be considered an important component of lifestyle modification for prevention and treatment of high blood pressure.



                    Effects of Endurance Training on Blood Pressure, Blood Pressure–Regulating Mechanisms, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors
                    Véronique A. Cornelissen, Robert H. Fagard

                    http://hyper.ahajournals.org/content/46/4/667.short

                    Abstract

                    Previous meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials on the effects of chronic dynamic aerobic endurance training on blood pressure reported on resting blood pressure only. Our aim was to perform a comprehensive meta-analysis including resting and ambulatory blood pressure, blood pressure–regulating mechanisms, and concomitant cardiovascular risk factors. Inclusion criteria of studies were: random allocation to intervention and control; endurance training as the sole intervention; inclusion of healthy sedentary normotensive or hypertensive adults; intervention duration of ≥4 weeks; availability of systolic or diastolic blood pressure; and publication in a peer-reviewed journal up to December 2003. The meta-analysis involved 72 trials, 105 study groups, and 3936 participants. After weighting for the number of trained participants and using a random-effects model, training induced significant net reductions of resting and daytime ambulatory blood pressure of, respectively, 3.0/2.4 mm Hg (P<0.001) and 3.3/3.5 mm Hg (P<0.01). The reduction of resting blood pressure was more pronounced in the 30 hypertensive study groups (−6.9/−4.9) than in the others (−1.9/−1.6; P<0.001 for all). Systemic vascular resistance decreased by 7.1% (P<0.05), plasma norepinephrine by 29% (P<0.001), and plasma renin activity by 20% (P<0.05). Body weight decreased by 1.2 kg (P<0.001), waist circumference by 2.8 cm (P<0.001), percent body fat by 1.4% (P<0.001), and the homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance by 0.31 U (P<0.01); HDL cholesterol increased by 0.032 mmol/L−1 (P<0.05). In conclusion, aerobic endurance training decreases blood pressure through a reduction of vascular resistance, in which the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system appear to be involved, and favorably affects concomitant cardiovascular risk factors.
                    Be true to yourself and fuel your body with nothing less the highest quality supplements. Only available at TrueNutrition.com Use discount code: KSP945 to save 5% on your order!

                    Stickies...just read the damn stickies...

                    2014 Xcalibur Cup Bantam Open - 1st
                    2014 Tracey Greenwood Classic Bantam Open - 1st
                    2015 Beat Cancer!

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                    • #11
                      Definitely going to do some cardio this bulk, my blood pressure got up to 170/98 last bulk.
                      My log: http://www.intensemuscle.com/showthread.php?t=47064

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