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anyone here write their LSAT?

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  • anyone here write their LSAT?

    do we have any lawyers on IM? what about soon to be lawyers? what about people studying for their LSAT?

    Did you choose to study or just write it raw?

    What methods did you use?

    Any advice?

  • #2
    I think superhuman111 is a lawyer (not sure what country though)...wouldn't hurt to PM him...seems willing to help.
    Max Muscle
    5020 Katella Ave.
    Los Alamitos, CA 90720
    www.MaxMuscleLosAlamitos.com

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    • #3
      I am a lawyer. It has been a while, but I believe I just took it raw. There are prep courses out there, but I didn't take any. Certainly, if you have the time and money, then a prep course would probably help. I can tell you that I took a bar review course prior to taking the bar exam and that helped a lot.

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      • #4
        I was a lawyer once, but I saw the light and left that caper behind. In Oz we don't have LSATs so can't help specifically on that point.

        However, I am now in finance and studying for the CFA. It is quite a difficult qualification to get. There are prep providers for that, and I have used them for Level I, Level II and currently Level III. So, yes, if it will give you an advantage, absolutely go through a prep provider.

        If you are the sort of person who likes studying by themselves with a book and pencil, maybe not, but I want all the help I can get to put me at the front of the pack.

        Good luck either way!
        My Log: Back to Basics

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        • #5
          I will be taking the LSAT in June and I would highly recommend either taking a course or studying yourself due to the state of our current legal market. The higher GPA + LSAT = more scholarships and less debt. Debt and the current legal market are two variants that I would consider before thinking about becoming a lawyer (if within the U.S.). PM me if you have further questions.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Clutch View Post
            I will be taking the LSAT in June and I would highly recommend either taking a course or studying yourself due to the state of our current legal market. The higher GPA + LSAT = more scholarships and less debt. Debt and the current legal market are two variants that I would consider before thinking about becoming a lawyer (if within the U.S.). PM me if you have further questions.
            I definitely agree with this. Law is so insanely oversaturated that if you can't get into a top 10 law school there isn't much point in going to law school right now.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by V5RED View Post
              I definitely agree with this. Law is so insanely oversaturated that if you can't get into a top 10 law school there isn't much point in going to law school right now.
              I'm in law school right now and I agree with this statement with the caveat that a strong regional school that isn't top 10 if you want practice in that region is probably an ok bet as well. For example, if you go to the best school in a major metro are even if it's ranked below top 10 there should be local jobs. Maybe (probably) not the insanely high paying ones but you will get by.

              I took a bunch of practice tests. Scored 173 on my first and 173 on the actual test despite higher practice scores, but I did think it helped me know what wA coming. If you go to a Kaplan place, lots of times they have free practice tests under real LSAT conditions. This was helpful for me mentally. IMO the courses are a waste of money, but that's because I have my doubts About their ability to improve your score unless you are not going to score particularly highly anyway.

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              • #8
                ALMOST Every lawyer I have met has told me NOT to do law school unless you:

                1. Are extremely interested in the field and don't care about money or being burdened with debt

                2. Have a close friend/relative high up at a law firm

                3. Go to a top 10 law firm

                Luckily I'm in Houston so even the lawyers that weren't top in their class can get pretty good corporate law jobs at an oil and gas company... or you could just do your undergrad in finance/accounting/engineering and work for a few years, that way you will be making a good salary and not have $100K + of debt.

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                • #9
                  I agree with everyone above who has commented. It will take either T14 ( top 14 law schools in the country) or a very strong regional school with a huge scholarship to overcome the debt burden law school will place on you. The T14 have the biggest shot at "biglaw" which are your $100,000+ income right out of law school, yet you need that much to offset the adverse debt you will find yourself in if you attend those schools.

                  If you attend a regional school with little to no debt, you may or may not attain "biglaw" solely depending on grades, work experience, ties, interviewing skills, etc. There is much more to what I and other posters have commented on and you will need to research as much as possible before you make a decision.

                  Check other forums on the net that pertain to law schools and you will find a wealth of information available.

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                  • #10
                    I don't post on here much (mostly a reader) but I took the LSAT last October. I highly recommend Blueprint! They helped me improve A LOT and as a result I have some nice scholarships at schools I'm looking at for next year. The methods they teach work really good if your persistent with your studying. You can improve and don't listen to anybody that tells you you cant, they don't know what they are talking about.

                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lrW8y...ueprint%20LSAT

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                    • #11
                      I got over 165. Powerscore books (except RC) and lots of practice through nearly all the prep tests. Especially drilling for time and on the sections/types of questions you don't do well on originally. Checkout http://lsatblog.blogspot.com/ for some tips.

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                      • #12
                        Be careful about scholarships. Some schools will offer the incoming 40-50% of 1L's a nice chunk of change to attend their school, yet you have to rank top 20% after your first year to keep it. And the individuals who are making the six figure salaries after law school are usually working close to 80 hour work weeks for the first couple years to get on the partner track. That doesn't leave you much time for family, friends, or the gym.

                        As for the prep courses, law school and the bar exam, think of them like you do when you go to the gym. You wouldn't go into a show without dieting and training, so why would you treat your career any differently?

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                        • #13
                          From my experience, and I have been practicing for a while, going to a top 10 law school will certainly give you a big advantage. However, if your aren't lucky enough to get in, or afford, a top-tier law school, it is still possible to land a job with a top 100 firm. You just have to find other ways to make yourself stand out from the other thousands of law school grads. There are also other options than working in private practice. The federal government hires many lawyers (DOJ, SEC, EPA, to name a few organizations). The pay is significantly less but it is a more family oriented life style. In-house positions are sought after. Low-level or front line attorney positions in-house do not pay as well as top-tier firms, but senior in-house positions can be more lucrative then private practice.

                          Law school debt is a big saddle that most law school grads carry around with them for a long time. The fact is that the tuition at many second and third tier law schools is just as expensive as the top tier law schools. I graduated from law school in 2000 and back then I was paying 40k a year in tuition and I did not go to a top tier law school.

                          The best advice I can give you is to really spend some time thinking about whether being a lawyer is what you really want to do. If you dream about working for a top tier firm, then you should also think about the long hours that are associated with being an attorney in private practice. The money a lot of the top tier firms pay to associates sounds like a lot, but when you break it down to the number of hours that you are required to devote to your job, it ends up not being that much. Then there is the stress that comes with the job. You stress out about billable hours and business development. When you are busy, you stress out about trying to get everything done in time. When you are not busy, you stress out about when the next piece of business will come in. It is a constant cycle.

                          There is a reason why being a lawyer is, on average, one of the most unhealthy professions out there. I am not trying to talk you out of law school. There a lot of things that I do like about my job. Just make sure you give it a lot of thought before you make the jump. I have seen a lot of law school grads end up deciding within a few years of graduation that they really did not like being a lawyer and leave the profession. The problem with this is that many of them are still saddled with large law school loans to pay off. Just make sure you don't end up in that category.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by TerpVTX View Post
                            From my experience, and I have been practicing for a while, going to a top 10 law school will certainly give you a big advantage. However, if your aren't lucky enough to get in, or afford, a top-tier law school, it is still possible to land a job with a top 100 firm. You just have to find other ways to make yourself stand out from the other thousands of law school grads. There are also other options than working in private practice. The federal government hires many lawyers (DOJ, SEC, EPA, to name a few organizations). The pay is significantly less but it is a more family oriented life style. In-house positions are sought after. Low-level or front line attorney positions in-house do not pay as well as top-tier firms, but senior in-house positions can be more lucrative then private practice.

                            Law school debt is a big saddle that most law school grads carry around with them for a long time. The fact is that the tuition at many second and third tier law schools is just as expensive as the top tier law schools. I graduated from law school in 2000 and back then I was paying 40k a year in tuition and I did not go to a top tier law school.

                            The best advice I can give you is to really spend some time thinking about whether being a lawyer is what you really want to do. If you dream about working for a top tier firm, then you should also think about the long hours that are associated with being an attorney in private practice. The money a lot of the top tier firms pay to associates sounds like a lot, but when you break it down to the number of hours that you are required to devote to your job, it ends up not being that much. Then there is the stress that comes with the job. You stress out about billable hours and business development. When you are busy, you stress out about trying to get everything done in time. When you are not busy, you stress out about when the next piece of business will come in. It is a constant cycle.

                            There is a reason why being a lawyer is, on average, one of the most unhealthy professions out there. I am not trying to talk you out of law school. There a lot of things that I do like about my job. Just make sure you give it a lot of thought before you make the jump. I have seen a lot of law school grads end up deciding within a few years of graduation that they really did not like being a lawyer and leave the profession. The problem with this is that many of them are still saddled with large law school loans to pay off. Just make sure you don't end up in that category.
                            Exactly! 30 years ago a law degree was awesome and even if you didn't want to be a lawyer it was like an advanced MBA... nowadays if you have a law degree and aren't a lawyer employers wonder why you wasted your time.

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                            • #15
                              My wife took it a couple years back after some issues with her employment. She really wasn't interested in going to Law school but it was kind of a I need a backup plan just in case. She used Kaplan for prep it was like 2 or 3 months long. Her instructor was great she said. When she first started she had a 162 on the diagnostic test and her official LSAT was 167. She said the biggest thing was just doing lots and lots and lots and lots of practice question (get the point). Working with several corporate lawyers they all said if you can't get into a top 15 school AND finish in the top quarter of your class, find a school that you probably can that will give you the most money. There is just way to many lawyers graduating right now. She never did end up going but I hope that helps a little.
                              Whatever your mind can conceive and believe, you can achieve!!!

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