Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

High School Wrestling - Diet Strategies (Skiploading?)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • High School Wrestling - Diet Strategies (Skiploading?)

    I lived & breathed wrestling in high school.....ended up doing fairly decent (top 8 at 171 lbs in PA....the mecca of high school wrestling) and even briefly extended my career in college until my engineering major caught up to me. After college, I coached for 3 years before things got too hectic.

    Most wrestlers (and their coaches) aren't exactly known for smart diet techniques. Usually, most guys starve themselves to make weight, drop a bunch of water weight a few days leading up to the match, end up gorging themselves after a weigh-in because they're famished, and repeat the process before next match. It's stupidity. I did it.....I didn't know any better.

    I remember weighing 183 lbs before a friday afternoon practice one day. Saturday we had a big match scheduled, and weigh-ins were around 9am. There was supposedly a "stud" at 171 lbs, so my coach asked me if there would be anyway possible of making 171 lbs by the next morning. So, I threw on the garbage bags (which is now illegal) and sweats, dropped 7-8 lbs during practice, went home and ran, ate a few ice cubes for supper, got up in the morning and ran again, and made weight. The problem was that the stud was up at 189 lbs....oops. Yeah, I wrestled him ....I dropped 12 lbs overnight.....and beat him with a takedown with 1 second to go. I literally almost collapsed coming off the mat.

    Now, my younger brother coaches the local high school team. He's asked me to try and come up with some general guidelines in regards to diet and hopefully get these kids on the right track when it comes to nutrition. (Yes, I know, good luck with that.) I'm thinking that a diet approach that incorporates some type of periodic refeed is needed since wrestlers exert a TON of energy at practice, and therefore are extremely depleted quite often. It's tough though, since the schedule varies so much.

    Common sense tells you that a wrestler should start the season already near his goal weight. Fat loss takes time, so trying to scramble and drop a bunch of weight in the 2 weeks of preseason isn't going to get you anything except dehydration. So, this part is a given. (This advice will mainly be geared to a dedicated individual who already has done the leg work during the summer. If you show up fat to start the season, there's not much that can be done quickly.)

    However, the schedule is all over the place. Sometimes there's 2-3 matches through the week, sometimes there are tournaments on the weekends that last 1-2 days (must make weight on both days), etc. So you can see why trying to lay out a diet plan would be difficult. The diet plan must be flexible for this reason.

    I'm a big fan of Skiploading. However, I'm not sure something like this would be possible with this type of schedule. I guess as long as you have enough time to baseline again (3-4 days) you'd be fine, but that's not always possible......and it may remain like that for a few weeks, making it hard to get a proper refeed fit in somewhere.

    Perhaps a smaller, more traditional (and boring), and maybe more frequent (2 per week) refeed would be more appropriate for something like this?

    For you diet gurus out there......what's your thoughts on something like this? Large weight fluccuations are going to be hard to deal with, so keeping the refeed smaller and more frequent may result in a more stable bodyweight. (But, in my opinion, inferior refeed results.)

    It's a tough one.
    Last edited by 5spotbullseye; 11-18-2011, 02:38 PM.

  • #2
    Provided you're between 10-15% BF, I don't think two refeeds per week would be inferior to one large one. Maybe when you're trying to get to low single digit BF it might, but as long as total caloric intake for the week is the same shouldn't have any impact

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by ZeroFries View Post
      Provided you're between 10-15% BF, I don't think two refeeds per week would be inferior to one large one. Maybe when you're trying to get to low single digit BF it might, but as long as total caloric intake for the week is the same shouldn't have any impact
      In my opinion, the single large refeed (with high GI carbs) is ALWAYS superior in regards to effectiveness, but I digress.

      On a side note (without being too rude), it was mentioned in another thread that if you're going to give advice on this board, you need to qualifiy yourself a little bit. This isn't like other message boards.....

      Comment


      • #4
        Good question and insight. I wrestled so I know where you are coming from. You definitely would need to be realistic and cautious since your dealing with someone's kids. My first thought would be this: I would do daily refeeds post workout. Instead of a normal IF type diet I would do two smaller meals earlier in the day with maybe an apple pre workout to keep them from gnawing their opponents arm off. Then when they got home they could have a loose refeed meal with their family. Telling parents their kid can't eat with them would be a sure fire way to have problems. As far as macros I would go low fat, moderate protein, and high carb on the earlier two meals. The postworkout refeed would have to be looser. This is just me thinking off the cuff, I'm sure I'm missing something, but this is my initial reaction.
        1994 Ohio Gran Prix 4th place
        2010 Kentucky State Championships 1st place
        2011 Northern Kentucky 4th place
        2012 Kentucky Grand Prix 1st place
        2014 Francois Classic 3rd place
        2015 Francois Classic 2nd Place

        Truenutrition.com
        Use Discount Code AMJ

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Doberman View Post
          Good question and insight. I wrestled so I know where you are coming from. You definitely would need to be realistic and cautious since your dealing with someone's kids. My first thought would be this: I would do daily refeeds post workout. Instead of a normal IF type diet I would do two smaller meals earlier in the day with maybe an apple pre workout to keep them from gnawing their opponents arm off. Then when they got home they could have a loose refeed meal with their family. Telling parents their kid can't eat with them would be a sure fire way to have problems. As far as macros I would go low fat, moderate protein, and high carb on the earlier two meals. The postworkout refeed would have to be looser. This is just me thinking off the cuff, I'm sure I'm missing something, but this is my initial reaction.
          Oh, this isn't going to be a "requirement".....merely a suggestion. Believe me, I know what you mean.

          I think a high carb approach is a must......way too much energy expenditure to be tying up valuable calories with unnecessary protein & fat. (These kids aren't bodybuilding.....they're wrestling.)

          So you're thinking about hitting some higher carbs everynight......interesting.

          Comment


          • #6
            [QUOTE=5spotbullseye I remember weighing 183 lbs before a friday afternoon practice one day. Saturday we had a big match scheduled, and weigh-ins were around 9am. There was supposedly a "stud" at 171 lbs, so my coach asked me if there would be anyway possible of making 171 lbs by the next morning. So, I threw on the garbage bags (which is now illegal) and sweats, dropped 7-8 lbs during practice, went home and ran, ate a few ice cubes for supper, got up in the morning and ran again, and made weight. The problem was that the stud was up at 189 lbs....oops. Yeah, I wrestled him ....I dropped 12 lbs overnight.....and beat him with a takedown with 1 second to go. I literally almost collapsed coming off the mat.[/QUOTE]

            I had the same exact experience except I was 112 and dropped to 103 in one day, ended up wrestling at 112's and lost by a last second takedown.

            The problem is that most kids don't have the support at home to eat healthy on a day to day basis. And most don't stay in condition during the off season. This is a tough one because you are dealing with teenagers who think they know better than most adults (a good percentage of them anyway). It's hard to hang out with your friends during lunch period watching them eat "crap" and you're starving.

            Doberman has a lot of experience and knows what he's talking about, but remember these are kids, and you can't hold their hand all day. Good luck with this and keep us posted on the outcome.

            T
            2014 USPA Nevada State / Regional Championships - 1,168 total

            2014 USPA National Championships - 1,235 total

            2014 Village Gym Meet - 1,260 total

            2015 USPA Camp Pendleton Meet - 1,235 total


            Journal: http://intensemuscle.com/showthread....80#post1112980

            Comment


            • #7
              Yeah, you know calories in versus calorie out is the most important thing in this scenario, but you also want it to be something they can stick to. Higher calories earlier in the day would probably work just fine as well as long as they are below maintenance, but like I said eating with the folks might keep it easier. Also, I remember how hungry I was after 2 hours of practice.
              1994 Ohio Gran Prix 4th place
              2010 Kentucky State Championships 1st place
              2011 Northern Kentucky 4th place
              2012 Kentucky Grand Prix 1st place
              2014 Francois Classic 3rd place
              2015 Francois Classic 2nd Place

              Truenutrition.com
              Use Discount Code AMJ

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by TLopez View Post
                I had the same exact experience except I was 112 and dropped to 103 in one day, ended up wrestling at 112's and lost by a last second takedown.

                The problem is that most kids don't have the support at home to eat healthy on a day to day basis. And most don't stay in condition during the off season. This is a tough one because you are dealing with teenagers who think they know better than most adults (a good percentage of them anyway). It's hard to hang out with your friends during lunch period watching them eat "crap" and you're starving.

                Doberman has a lot of experience and knows what he's talking about, but remember these are kids, and you can't hold their hand all day. Good luck with this and keep us posted on the outcome.

                T
                Just to be clear, this is geared for a higher-level wrestler who has the drive & determination and WANTS to do it. We're not going to push this on anyone.....

                Yes, most teenagers have CRAPPY diets.....no doubt about that. (Heck, most PEOPLE as well.) However some of them are actually interested in doing it the right way. I'm just trying to formulate a generalized plan that would be effective.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Doberman View Post
                  Yeah, you know calories in versus calorie out is the most important thing in this scenario, but you also want it to be something they can stick to. Higher calories earlier in the day would probably work just fine as well as long as they are below maintenance, but like I said eating with the folks might keep it easier. Also, I remember how hungry I was after 2 hours of practice.
                  You ain't kidding. It was torture around the holidays......

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by TLopez View Post
                    I had the same exact experience except I was 112 and dropped to 103 in one day, ended up wrestling at 112's and lost by a last second takedown.

                    The problem is that most kids don't have the support at home to eat healthy on a day to day basis. And most don't stay in condition during the off season. This is a tough one because you are dealing with teenagers who think they know better than most adults (a good percentage of them anyway). It's hard to hang out with your friends during lunch period watching them eat "crap" and you're starving.

                    Doberman has a lot of experience and knows what he's talking about, but remember these are kids, and you can't hold their hand all day. Good luck with this and keep us posted on the outcome.

                    T
                    Agreed. Dieting for kids is going to be a battle and it might be easier for some at home, but I'm just going from personal experience that I ate what was given to me. They didn't really customize my meals...lol, but I agree with the dieting at lunch around friends part. I was able to do it, but I was always the weird guy ordering the salad. Like 5spotbullseye if you have a higher level athlete this might not be a problem.
                    1994 Ohio Gran Prix 4th place
                    2010 Kentucky State Championships 1st place
                    2011 Northern Kentucky 4th place
                    2012 Kentucky Grand Prix 1st place
                    2014 Francois Classic 3rd place
                    2015 Francois Classic 2nd Place

                    Truenutrition.com
                    Use Discount Code AMJ

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X