Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Reps, Age, and Muscle

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Reps, Age, and Muscle

    First: This is not how I train; it is merely a thought I had based on personal observation.

    Second: I realize anecdotal evidence doesn't prove anything. I'm just looking for thoughts/feedback, and similar and/or differing observations.


    When I go to a new gym, I look for 3 types of people:
    1. The people doing things different from everyone else. a) because they can be rather amusing. b) so I can watch their progress to see if they actually get anything out of their novel ideas.

    2. The people who have obviously gotten/are getting results. Whether they have a killer physique, are crazy strong, or are just plain massive. I make sure to pick their brains about training/diet, and usually get similar answers: Eat a lot, lift heavy stuff for with awesome intensity, then eat a little less to get lean.

    3. The people who have been at it for a long time. These are the people that i'm interested in for purposes of this thread, because they have gotten results in the long run, but, in my experience, tend to approach things differently than the people in group 2.


    The main person I'm basing this on is my great uncle Steve. He's in his late 60s and has as good of a physique as you could really expect at his age. He has 18 inch arms, a great back, and visible abs 365 days a year.
    His routine:
    4 sets of 350 pushups with his feet on a bench
    4 sets of pulldowns, same reps
    4 sets of situps with his feet on a bench, same reps
    10 minutes on a stair stepper between each exercise (messed his knees up in a motorcycle wreck)
    Another example: a guy who trains at the local YMCA names Dave. 72 years old, 5'8" and 185 pounds at 10% bf year round (he doesn't think its safe to get any leaner at his age, which is probably true). Really balanced physique, used to be a bodybuilder.
    His routine:
    Typical BB split: shoulders/arms, chest/tris, back/bis, legs (abs before each workout). however, he does 4 sets for each exercise. 1x100, 1x75, 1x50, 1x25.
    Another: a guy names Mike who trains at the gym I lift at back home...occasionally. He may be the worst of these example, because he is definitely a genetic anomaly. However, he is 58 years old, uses a routine very similar to the one Dave uses, except that he spreads it out to train each muscle once every 2 weeks, and is perhaps the biggest man I've seen in person.

    So these guys go about things completely different from most people, but all of them achieve the results they want (Steve and Dave want to look good, Mike wants to just be huge), have been training for a LONG time, and I know Steve and Dave have never gotten lifting-related injuries (they haven't in the last 5 years, I know, and they claim they never have). I'm not sure about Mike, as we usually train at different times and I've only talked to him a couple of times. It just makes me wonder if these guys are onto something. I wouldn't go as far as to theorize that a young healthy person should train like this, but I wonder if it has merit for people who want to gain/maintain muscle as they age.

    Again, I am NOT positing that something similar to this is better than DC or any other routine. I just wonder if other people have seen the same thing, or have an explanation for it.

  • #2
    Dante once posted something about big guys that do "weird" shit in the gym and then claim that that particular routine is the reason for their size. I think he said this in the Jason Huh thread we had a few months back.

    His point was that a lot of guys seem to forget how they got to a certain point. I seriously doubt your uncle Steve build a good physique on push ups and pulldowns.
    Disclaimer: I am not a DC trainee/expert/guru/coach, anything I say is purely my opinion based on experience and research I've read

    Comment


    • #3
      Genetics. Genetics. Genetics. Maybe he got his physique IN SPITE of what he was doing, and not because of it. Look at guys like Ronnie Coleman. Dude could have probably trained any way he wanted (with bodybuilding being the focus of his training of course), as long as he trained hard, and he would still be the great we all know.

      I don't look at great bodybuilders, or really big guys that have never been any other way and ask there advice...I like to know what the guys who went from skinny to huge did.

      2012 EUP's Mission Submission II
      -1st SuperHeavy Gi
      2012 Hayastan Grappling Challenge New York
      -1st Heavyweight Gi
      2011 Slippery Rock Open Collegiate Championships, 4th-Open Heavyweight, 220lbs
      2008 NGA Pittsburgh Bodybuilding Championships, 2nd-Open Juniors, 175lbs




      Help me, help you! To get a great discount from TrueNutrition just type in MCS722 in the code box when you check out!


      New pursuit: competitive grappling, and enjoying my life

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Lock it Up View Post
        Genetics. Genetics. Genetics. Maybe he got his physique IN SPITE of what he was doing, and not because of it. Look at guys like Ronnie Coleman. Dude could have probably trained any way he wanted (with bodybuilding being the focus of his training of course), as long as he trained hard, and he would still be the great we all know.

        I don't look at great bodybuilders, or really big guys that have never been any other way and ask there advice...I like to know what the guys who went from skinny to huge did.
        I agree

        Comment


        • #5
          my first reaction is to agree with you. however, just to briefly play devil's advocate:

          According to Dave, he got his initial size using the same split, but heavier weight and lower reps. However, his all-time biggest was 205, so still maintaining 185 into his 70s is pretty impressive to me.

          My great uncle did not start training at all until after his motorcycle wreck (late 40s), and the routine I posted is all he's ever done. He started with lower reps (25, i think), and just increased reps with the same weight whenever he could, eventually getting to the 350 number i posted. Genetics? Perhaps. That side of the family has a few freaks on it. However, building the body he has, starting as late as he did, is still impressive to me.

          Mike: very well could be genetics, as i ceded in my initial post


          Also, i'll readily admit that my scope is narrow, as I haven't been in 50 gyms and seen a broad swath of the world. I'm just noting things based on my observation that the only people I personally know that are still that physically impressive past their mid-fifties all go about things in an unconventional way.

          Comment


          • #6
            gentics all the way

            Comment


            • #7
              I'm closing in on 70 and I try to keep the weights relatively light. Reps probably stay in the 10-15 range. I still run and get the majority of my leg work from this. I also do a lot of walking. I'm not going to win a bodybuilding show, but I keep limber and feel good.

              Comment

              Working...
              X