Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Study Shows Why It's Hard to Keep Weight Off

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Study Shows Why It's Hard to Keep Weight Off

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/27/he...udy-finds.html

    In the study, Joseph Proietto and his colleagues at the University of Melbourne recruited people who weighed an average of 209 pounds. At the start of the study, his team measured the participants’ hormone levels and assessed their hunger and appetites after they ate a boiled egg, toast, margarine, orange juice and crackers for breakfast. The dieters then spent 10 weeks on a very low calorie regimen of 500 to 550 calories a day intended to makes them lose 10 percent of their body weight. In fact, their weight loss averaged 14 percent, or 29 pounds. As expected, their hormone levels changed in a way that increased their appetites, and indeed they were hungrier than when they started the study.

    They were then given diets intended to maintain their weight loss. A year after the subjects had lost the weight, the researchers repeated their measurements. The subjects were gaining the weight back despite the maintenance diet — on average, gaining back half of what they had lost — and the hormone levels offered a possible explanation.

    One hormone, leptin, which tells the brain how much body fat is present, fell by two-thirds immediately after the subjects lost weight. When leptin falls, appetite increases and metabolism slows. A year after the weight loss diet, leptin levels were still one-third lower than they were at the start of the study, and leptin levels increased as subjects regained their weight.

    Other hormones that stimulate hunger, in particular ghrelin, whose levels increased, and peptide YY, whose levels decreased, were also changed a year later in a way that made the subjects’ appetites stronger than at the start of the study.

    The results show, once again, Dr. Leibel said, that losing weight “is not a neutral event,” and that it is no accident that more than 90 percent of people who lose a lot of weight gain it back. “You are putting your body into a circumstance it will resist,” he said. “You are, in a sense, more metabolically normal when you are at a higher body weight.”
    More at the link.

    Your thoughts? This makes perfect sense (and I pretty much knew it) about my post-contest conditioning and how easily I bounce back up to my normal bf% and then maintain that without trying.
    Owner of 316FIT and Team Skip Approved Trainer


    Instagram: @jaredragsdale
    FB: www.fb.com/jared.ragsdale
    www.316fit.com
    Email: [email protected]


  • #2
    So they did a "crash diet" to initially lose the weight?
    My log: http://www.intensemuscle.com/showthread.php?t=47064

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by PBRevolution View Post
      So they did a "crash diet" to initially lose the weight?
      Yes, but then they gave them a maintenance diet for 1 full year.
      Owner of 316FIT and Team Skip Approved Trainer


      Instagram: @jaredragsdale
      FB: www.fb.com/jared.ragsdale
      www.316fit.com
      Email: [email protected]

      Comment


      • #4
        I saw this study too and I think if your someone who is overweight (not necessarily obese, but just not naturally super-lean) this study makes sense. I know I have lost weight many times in my life and leaned out, only to slowly gain that weight back again over time, bringing me right back to pretty much the same bf%. The leaner I get, the hungrier I am. I'm no scientist, but this study makes perfect sense...

        So what the HELL is the solution?! lol
        It takes work to get things done, but in reality not getting things done is a lot more painful. -Knickerbocker24

        Start doing and believing in the stuff that works, and do it today and forever. You want science and studies? Fuck you. I’ve got scars and blood and vomit. -Jim Wendler


        My 5/3/1 Journal

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Jeff Grant View Post
          I saw this study too and I think if your someone who is overweight (not necessarily obese, but just not naturally super-lean) this study makes sense. I know I have lost weight many times in my life and leaned out, only to slowly gain that weight back again over time, bringing me right back to pretty much the same bf%. The leaner I get, the hungrier I am. I'm no scientist, but this study makes perfect sense...

          So what the HELL is the solution?! lol
          Exactly what I have noticed time after time after time.
          Owner of 316FIT and Team Skip Approved Trainer


          Instagram: @jaredragsdale
          FB: www.fb.com/jared.ragsdale
          www.316fit.com
          Email: [email protected]

          Comment


          • #6
            I wonder if there is a way around this? This is a huge caloric deficit so of course there will be huge metabolic changes. I have seen studies that show when the caloric deficit is small(500cal/day) none of the negative hormonal consequences happen. Maybe the key is very slow fat loss caused by a slight increase in activity combined with a small decrease in calories. That is what Clarence Bass does and he has managed to stay very lean for years.

            Comment


            • #7
              The study is way too small for me, 50 people, and 16 of them quit. There are a lot of people that have lost a lot of weight on the biggest loser and have not gained it back. I would actually like the real Numbers from that show, to see how many of them gain it back. I know some do.
              But it is interesting. But a bigger study needs to be done.

              Comment


              • #8
                I look at these types of studies and wonder who the fcuk actually adheres to the 500 kcal a day?? Even if all the meals are provided for them I'm sure they all cheat to some extent.

                I mean look at us as amateur and even semi-professional bodybuilders... the most motivated and disciplined dieters on the planet... and even we cheat from time to time.

                And of course they're going to say they 'stuck' with the diet... they have to in order to get their $500 or whatever participation 'compensation'.

                Geez I live in Australia and have been a trainer and I can barely get any clients who can make it a week without getting pissed.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Lyle McDonald has been talking about this for a long time. He's an asshole, but he's smart.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by -AJA14- View Post
                    The study is way too small for me, 50 people, and 16 of them quit. There are a lot of people that have lost a lot of weight on the biggest loser and have not gained it back. I would actually like the real Numbers from that show, to see how many of them gain it back. I know some do.
                    But it is interesting. But a bigger study needs to be done.
                    Actually very few seem to have kept it off after that show. Really look it up and do some Google searches and you'll see.

                    But anyway as to whether there is a way to combat this.... For the BBrs that eat 'clean' and gain a lot after a show do to a bounce back in hunger.... It's harder but for the avg person YES it can be beat and that's just with choices and volume if food. I have several people down well over 100 and all have kept it off...how? They are consuming a greater volume of food now than they did when they were big, or at least as much. If someone can go from a diet of fast food, fried foods, high cal foods and make the change to a diet high in greens, grilled chicken, fish and beef, etc... They will never be "hungry"... I am not saying they will always enjoy it or that they will never have any fast food or fried foods but if on a regular basis they can change from eating "dirty" to "clean" they should have no hunger issues.
                    Follow my NEW journal if you please:


                    http://www.intensemuscle.com/showthread.php?t=48304

                    "They say I'm no good...cause I'm so hood, rich folks do not want me around" 50

                    "You are you. That is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You."
                    Dr. Seuss


                    I would like to thank all the stupid people of the world. Without you guys I would only be average.


                    "Tell them bitches get a stick I'm done leading the blind"
                    Nicki Minaj

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DShores View Post
                      I have seen studies that show when the caloric deficit is small(500cal/day) none of the negative hormonal consequences happen. Maybe the key is very slow fat loss caused by a slight increase in activity combined with a small decrease in calories. That is what Clarence Bass does and he has managed to stay very lean for years.
                      B I N G O.

                      That is the big difference, right there.

                      Skip


                      Facebook: Skip Hill
                      Instagram: @intensemuscle
                      YouTube: TEAMSKIP
                      TikTok: @intensemuscle


                      For Training Inquiries: [email protected]

                      Use discount code "SKIP" and get your TEAM SKIP protein here: www.TrueNutrition.com/TEAMSKIPblend

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DShores View Post
                        I wonder if there is a way around this? This is a huge caloric deficit so of course there will be huge metabolic changes. I have seen studies that show when the caloric deficit is small(500cal/day) none of the negative hormonal consequences happen. Maybe the key is very slow fat loss caused by a slight increase in activity combined with a small decrease in calories. That is what Clarence Bass does and he has managed to stay very lean for years.
                        I'm certainly no authority and won't claim to be, but I think this is a big part of the equation. From what I've read, refeeds- whether they're planned and careful or even 'see-food' cheat days- can also go a long way toward keeping these hormonal changes in check.

                        So people ended up with problems after 10 weeks on 500/kcal a day? No shit! This is why everyone looking for an instant fix gets fucked in the end (fueled by shit like the Biggest Loser and nearly every advertisement for fitness and lose-weight-quick schemes).

                        I've love to see a study with some thought behind it- I can see the headline now... "Today scientists found that dieting in a patient and sensible fashion was effective for reduction of bodyfat without shitcanning one's metabolism"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by RickB666 View Post
                          I'm certainly no authority and won't claim to be, but I think this is a big part of the equation. From what I've read, refeeds- whether they're planned and careful or even 'see-food' cheat days- can also go a long way toward keeping these hormonal changes in check.

                          So people ended up with problems after 10 weeks on 500/kcal a day? No shit! This is why everyone looking for an instant fix gets fucked in the end (fueled by shit like the Biggest Loser and nearly every advertisement for fitness and lose-weight-quick schemes).

                          I've love to see a study with some thought behind it- I can see the headline now... "Today scientists found that dieting in a patient and sensible fashion was effective for reduction of bodyfat without shitcanning one's metabolism"
                          Yes...after that extreme deficit the 'maintanance' diet was almost like a refeed to them - for a far too long a period......lol... they were primed to absorb and use the food...

                          I wonder what would've happened if they did one day at 500 kcals and then the next day at maintanance or more afterwards...

                          I bet the leptin problems would've been much better and the weight loss might even have continued...Toggling between periods of fewer and more calories/ lower and higher carbs even, do indeed have positive effects on leptin and insulin sensitivity and is key in fatloss and maintaining weight

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I think possibly the increased hormone levels are due to the body being in starvation mode. If you're gonna eat below your metabolic rate then the body would want to hold on to everything it could, correct?
                            TRUE PROTEIN Discount Code- CSH730

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Ghrelin is a bastard and always wants us to go back to our baseline. It's pretty sad really, lots of studies support this.

                              Our hormones conspire to keep us fat and to bring us back to our fat selves, it does so mainly by regulating appetite and lowering metabolic rate. You can fight it but again studies show that post-obese individuals have a much slower metabolic rate then normal weight individuals even if they lost weight sensibly and have been maintaining it for several months.

                              I remember a study showing a 200 calorie per day discrepancy in 2 groups of females to maintain a certain weight.
                              If it's not hard it's not worth doing...
                              http://www.facebook.com/HyperforceStrength <--- Follow Hyperforce on Facebook

                              2004 National Capital Classic - 2nd Middleweight
                              2001 Ottawa Championships - 4th Middleweight
                              2000 Ottawa Championships - 12th Middleweight

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X