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  • Hypertrophy: hit the muscle not the tendon

    After reading numerous gh15 posts, it got me thinking (about training, not mega dosing)...

    He made mention several times that for pure size (not strength) to lift with proper form to hit the muscle, rather than making strong tendons.


    I've had good success with DC and have no plans to stop, but I do wonder if focusing on using the targeted muscle with less weight (but still progressing) would have a greater impact on size.


    Thoughts?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Undertow View Post
    After reading numerous gh15 posts, it got me thinking (about training, not mega dosing)...

    He made mention several times that for pure size (not strength) to lift with proper form to hit the muscle, rather than making strong tendons.


    I've had good success with DC and have no plans to stop, but I do wonder if focusing on using the targeted muscle with less weight (but still progressing) would have a greater impact on size.


    Thoughts?
    I hope this doesn't come off as scolding. I just want to make a point. Two things I see that are wrong with the question. When did Dante say not to use proper form? And when did he mention not focusing on the target muscle? This is what you do with DC. Yes you want to use some heavy slag iron, but this is not powerlifting either.

    If you look at Dante's original posts he recommended a very slow cadence, (I'm not sure, but I think he even said 611) especially on the negative. From, what I can see this was more of a point he was trying to make, rather than a rule. So to answer your question; drop the weights a little and control the negative. You might want to start by counting your negatives. The more you get used to feeling the muscle with the slow negative the more this will feel instinctive. Remember the rep should be like a piston. Good luck.
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    • #3
      Originally posted by Doberman View Post
      I hope this doesn't come off as scolding. I just want to make a point. Two things I see that are wrong with the question. When did Dante say not to use proper form? And when did he mention not focusing on the target muscle? This is what you do with DC. Yes you want to use some heavy slag iron, but this is not powerlifting either.

      If you look at Dante's original posts he recommended a very slow cadence, (I'm not sure, but I think he even said 611) especially on the negative. From, what I can see this was more of a point he was trying to make, rather than a rule. So to answer your question; drop the weights a little and control the negative. You might want to start by counting your negatives. The more you get used to feeling the muscle with the slow negative the more this will feel instinctive. Remember the rep should be like a piston. Good luck.
      Very good response.
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      • #4
        Originally posted by Doberman View Post
        I hope this doesn't come off as scolding. I just want to make a point. Two things I see that are wrong with the question. When did Dante say not to use proper form? And when did he mention not focusing on the target muscle? This is what you do with DC. Yes you want to use some heavy slag iron, but this is not powerlifting either.

        If you look at Dante's original posts he recommended a very slow cadence, (I'm not sure, but I think he even said 611) especially on the negative. From, what I can see this was more of a point he was trying to make, rather than a rule. So to answer your question; drop the weights a little and control the negative. You might want to start by counting your negatives. The more you get used to feeling the muscle with the slow negative the more this will feel instinctive. Remember the rep should be like a piston. Good luck.
        Not scolding at all...I should have phrased the question better.



        With "good" form being relative we aren't comparing apples to apples. While I know Dante recommends good form, he also mocks those that over think it (e.g. with a twist to the pinky). I've never read him make mention about the importance of the mind/muscle connection ensuring the muscle rather than the tendons are getting hit.


        PS - I know Dante likely would think this thread is retarded and that I am over thinking it all, but I was hoping to get responses from DCers and non-DCers alike, which is why I didn't post this in the dogpound.

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        • #5
          It's been awhile since I've dug through any of Dante's posts but I know I've read something he wrote about "feeling" the movement. There are several factors that play into what you are talking about. Number 1 is how you currently and have previously been training because different forms of movement (slower and controlled versus more ballistic) will illicit different responses. The more ballistic will have more connective tissue involvement because they are going to kind of help rebound the weight. Slower more controlled movements where you are really controlling tempo won't so much. Both, however, can illicit a hypertrophy response. If a lifter goes several training cycles doing primarily heavier, lower rep, more ballistic training and growth slows down changing to some more controlled, higher rep training. The same goes the other way as well. The thing to remember is that everything works, but nothing works forever. I don't think you can grow optimally by using only 1 form of training exclusively. That's why intelligent programming is so important.

          Of course this is also assuming proper nutrition and sleep as well.
          Trey Potter CSCS

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          • #6
            He was probably just saying "use good form in a bodybuilding rep range" (lighter weight) instead of "horrible form with weights you can't really handle and reps too low". Just common sense, really.

            It's funny how people always say x routine (like DC) got them injured. More likely their shit form and trying to pretend they are stronger than they really are.
            Last edited by RedSkull; 10-10-2011, 08:01 AM.
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            • #7
              Originally posted by RedSkull View Post
              He was probably just saying "use good form in a bodybuilding rep range" (lighter weight) instead of "horrible form with weights you can't really handle and reps too low". Just common sense, really.

              It's funny how people always say x routine (like DC) got them injured. More likely their shit form and trying to pretend they are stronger than they really are.
              Well said...if anything my form is too strict, so I'm likely over thinking.

              Thanks for the input guys. Time to go beat my log!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Undertow View Post
                ..... I've never read him make mention about the importance of the mind/muscle connection ensuring the muscle rather than the tendons are getting hit......
                The mind-muscle connection is one of the primary reasons why Dante so strongly advocates that only experienced lifters use his program. It takes years to fully develop that link and some never do get it. But it is definitely an important part of the quation with DC or any training program.
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