Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Myoreps - Just a more complicated rest pause method or genuinely useful?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Myoreps - Just a more complicated rest pause method or genuinely useful?

    Myo-Reps - by Borge "Blade" Fagerli

    Myo-reps is a method, not a program, so it can be used with most program setups instead of "traditional" strength training. The idea is to achieve maximum muscle fiber activation and then get in as many effective reps as possible while maintaining that activation by limiting the rest periods of the following sets.

    There are mainly three ways to achieve full activation:

    1. Lifting a light weight explosively. Also called speed-training. As long as you accelerate the weight to the maximum, you can get reasonably close to 100% activation.

    2. Lift a heavy weight of approximately 5-6RM or heavier, and try to lift as explosive as possible. Although the movement is slow, you will achieve maximum fiber activation as a result of the load. Heavier weights are primarily lifted by the coordination of nerve impulses, and not by increased fiber activation.

    3. Lift light to moderate weight to or close to failure. Muscle fiber activation follows the so-called size principle in which the smallest and weakest (and most enduring) are activated first, and the larger and stronger muscle fibers after that - when there is a need for them. When you reach failure, the activated muscle fibers aren't generating enough tension to lift the load. Fatigue can be neural - which among other things implies a reflective inhibition of nerve impulses to muscles in order to avoid overloading. There will also be varying degrees of metabolic fatigue, the accumulation of H+ ions and lack of ATP.

    But you don't want to go too close to failure, because that will limit your training volume too much – you won't be able to do enough reps for an optimal training effect and keep your training frequency high enough. It's a fine line between enough fatigue to reach sufficient fiber activation and too much fatigue causing failure, and it requires knowing your own limits and training tolerance. That's part of why this is not a suitable method for beginners, and you should have a few years of training experience before using Myo-reps. (Another part is that you should have a correct technique on all exercises – critical since you will be training so close to failure.)

    So, to achieve full fiber activation, you will first perform an activation set, (typically a longer set of e.g. 10 reps) where you should go close to failure (but not all the way). Stop when rep speed is noticeably slower than the previous repetition, or when you know you might be able to do 1 more rep, but not 2.

    Next goal is to maintain the activation so that every following rep is "effective" (that is, expose all the activated muscle fibers to the load), and perform as many of these effective reps as possible, and thus lead to a maximum signal response and training effect. You achieve this by taking only short rests of about 10-20 seconds (5-10 deep breaths) between the following sets. Through the rapid recycling of ATP, you can continue with sets of 1-5 reps using the same load. And this is where you'll need experience and knowing your limits – just enough fatigue to maintain close to 100% fiber activation, but not so much that it will limit the number of total reps too much for necessary volume. It is a delicate balance.

    So, from now on you will be more aware of rep speed, or how explosive you can lift the weight. This in itself is helping to provide full fiber activation, but will also act as an indicator of how close you are to failure. So, as soon as the rep speed is significantly reduced from one rep to the next, you are getting too close to failure, and it is time to stop the set.

    You should use some method to auto-regulate your training volume, so that you will be training according to your current ability (which depends on stress, recovery, sleep, nutrition, etc).

    For example:
    Quote:
    I've implemented a fatigue-stop method akin to Mike T in his RTS system (he uses a % table) where you use RPE and rep speed to determine how to continue the set. So for example:

    10 reps (activation) + 10sec rest, 3 reps + 10 sec rest, 3 reps (third rep slow and grindy) this is Fatigue Stop 1 (FS1)

    now... + 20sec rest, 2 reps (so - longer rest and less reps) + 20sec rest, 2 reps etc until 2nd rep slow and grindy - you've reached Fatigue Stop 2 (FS2) so STOP.

    At heavier loads, you switch to lighter loads at FS1, as mentioned.

    This will auto-regulate your volume, moreso limiting it when your recuperative abilities are limited as I do not recommend going beyond a pre-determined volume by more than 40-50%.
    Heavier loads require fewer reps after the activation set because you are close to maximum fiber recruitment from the first rep. Lighter loads require more reps, because the actual tension per fiber unit is lower, and you must let the load "work" on the muscle longer to compensate. At the same time you must consider that it will be beneficial to get more recovery early in the training phase so that you'll be able to push heavy in the end, so you should aim to keep the number of reps after the activation set pretty much in the same area throughout the whole training phase.

    General guidelines:

    +15-20 when you have only one exercise for a muscle group, for priority muscle groups, when you use lighter weights, or just have a higher volume tolerance

    +10-15 when you have two exercises for a muscle group, or have a moderate volume tolerance

    +5-10 when you have several exercises for a muscle group, when you’re lifting very heavy weights, or if you for various reasons have lower volume tolerance.

    All these reps after the activation set will be more effective than when taking a longer break (typically 1-3 minutes) between the sets and having to "start over" on the next set to achieve full fiber activation again. Also note that when you perform more than one exercise for a muscle group, you will reach full activation sooner due to accumulation of fatigue, so the activation set can be shorter. So, with the second or third exercise, rather shorten the activation set instead of reducing the load.

    An example series of Myo-reps might look like this:
    11 reps (close to failure) + 3 reps + 3 reps + 3 reps + 2 reps + 2 reps + 2 reps
    = 11 +15 reps

    As many of you may have noticed, Myo-reps has many similarities to the well-known and efficient DC-method which is also utilizing rest-pause training. The most critical difference is that you want to rather control fatigue than to use it as a goal in itself, as that will allow you to increase the total training volume and frequency.

    Now, let's compare Myo-reps to the "traditional" training protocol.
    Here's a hypothetical example of a standard 3 sets of 10 reps with 2 min rests between the sets. The "effective" reps near maximum fiber activation are marked with *:

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8* 9* 10*
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7* 8* 9* 10*
    1 2 3 4 5 6* 7* 8* 9*

    That's 29 total reps of which 11 was effective with full fiber activation.
    And a series of Myo-reps (10-20 second rests):

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8* 9* 10*
    1* 2* 3* 4*
    1* 2* 3* 4*
    1* 2* 3*
    1* 2* 3*
    (= 10+14 reps)

    24 total reps of which 17 effective.

    Do you see the difference? Because of the short rests every rep after the activation set was effective. And you used maybe half of the time. You will in other words train as effectively as possible instead of as much as possible.

    The extent to which the density (total number of reps performed per hour) plays a role in the training effect, we don't know for sure. There are some indications of a higher density providing a better stimulus.


    Let's look at what an example training phase could look like from the beginning to the end. You would increase your weights approximately 5% from week to week.

    Week 1-2: 50-55%, 20-25 +15 (20-25 +5+5+5)
    Week 3-4: 60-65%, 15-20 +16 (15-20 +4+4+4+4)
    Week 5-6: 70%, 12-15 +15 (12-15 +3+3+3+3+3)
    Week 7-9: 75%, 10-12 +15 (10-12 +3+3+3+2+2+2)
    Week 10-12: 80%, 8-10 +14 (8-10 +2+2+2+2+2+2+2)
    Week 13-14: 80-85%, 6-8 +4, reduce load by 10-20% and continue 5-10 +6 (6-8 +2+2 # 5-10 +3+3)

    This is just an example, it will obviously depend on how fast you increase the weights, and how quickly your strength increases. And remember to deload at some point, maybe with regular sets and longer rest periods.

    Recommended volume is 20-30 total reps for a muscle group, up to 40-50 total reps when overlapping or prioritizing, 2-3 times a week. The simple version has a more or less static approach of 25-30 total reps (activation + Myo-reps series) so e.g. 15 +10 or 10 +15, or with heavier loads 8 +5 and a lighter dropset 10 +5. In the beginning of the training phase it's a good idea to use a full body routine 3-4 times a week, until you get to a little heavier loads and about 12-15 rep range in the activation set, when you might want to switch to a 2-split routine with about 4 weekly workouts.

    Remember that a muscle cannot count, as the background for this volume recommendation has a larger context: the weights should be heavy enough to provide the necessary stimulus for the muscle and provide the necessary time under load (total reps), while not overloading tendons, joints and nervous system.

    Also keep in mind that the most important requisite for muscle growth will still be progression of load, and to achieve it you need to train exactly enough to provide a training effect, but not so much that you are not able to recover from workout to workout (or you won't be able to meet the primary goal: increasing your weights).

    A final note: Back squat, front squat and deadlift (and very often barbell row) are exercises where correct technique is critical to avoid injuries. When you're training as close to failure as you are with Myo-reps, it's easy to get sloppy with technique with these exercises, so to be on the safe side it's better to do standard sets with longer rest periods here.


    Oh, and Blade just wanted to add the following, thinking you nerds would be interested:



    Originally posted by Blade
    Both muscle fiber recruitment as well as rate coding seem to be important for optimal stimulation. You may have full fiber recruitment by lifting heavy loads (80%+) or by lifting very explosively, but to achieve higher rate coding you most likely need to work closer to failure (on the first set).


    An added benefit of the short rests and short sets in the Myo-rep series is not only that you maintain fiber recruitment/rate coding, but also that there seems to be more stimulation from higher sparks of Ca+ fluxes via calcineurin, and important mediator/modulator of hypertrophy. Wernbom has looked into this and there are a couple of interesting newer studies which elucidates this further. Also, there is a theoretical advantage of having the tissue resetting and sensing separate mechanical strain events vs. a long series of reps which is sensed differently. This probably ties in with allowing the tissue to be flooded with blood and oxygen (hyperemia) vs. a hypoxic condition as in continuous tension and endurance-specific signaling.



    http://www.clutchfitness.com/forums/...ead.php?t=9363


    Has anyone ever used this? Reminds me of RP except instead of reaching failure you appear to control it here. I don't really understand how this would work in progress and I can't really find a good video on what an average MR set would look like, but it's all sounds pretty reasonable.
    Disclaimer: I am not a DC trainee/expert/guru/coach, anything I say is purely my opinion based on experience and research I've read

  • #2
    I did but not long enough to really give an opinion. Blade or Borge really does put a lot of thought into what he does, just my $0.02. He posts here once and a while I believe so maybe he can comment
    For Training Inquiries go see the HNIC [email protected] anything else is uncivilized

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm applying it to some of my lifts. Really works with back/pull stuff, but at OHP I almost whacked myself so not gonna use MR at OHP for now. He posts at Bodyrecomposition forum under the name 'Blade' also.
      Last edited by csmrtr; 07-13-2011, 12:30 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Yeah, that's pretty much where I was introduced to it. He usually posts really interesting stuff so I was wondering what people over here thought about it.
        Disclaimer: I am not a DC trainee/expert/guru/coach, anything I say is purely my opinion based on experience and research I've read

        Comment


        • #5
          Interesting that you post this up, as I've been playing around with something slightly similar recently, and had no idea about this.

          I think I understand the execution, but the difficulty, (at least for me) would be that the program seems dependant upon the lifter's ability to perform reps after the "activation set" that are short of failure and elicit an appropriate amount of fatigue and stimulus such that the volume isn't excessive. (I have a problem with volume training in that I tend to not do a good job holding back on a set and like to bring them to failure...)

          It seems that your experience would guide the following:

          -# of Reps and # of mini-set before each "Fatigue Stop" and when each Fatigue Stop would occur.

          (What is the purpose here and why go to longer rest intervals and fewer reps after this and how do you know how many reps to do?...)

          -How to gauge things week by week in terms of progression...

          My issue would be ensure progressive overload here b/c if you're stopping short of failure each time, you could progress for several weeks in getting more reps simply by taking the sets closer to failure.

          (If you're working at "80%", then you can simply work at 82%, 84% and 86% for the following weeks, but this does not ensure that your "100%" has improved. Perhaps you have to work through an entire cycle of several weeks to gauge and ensure progression by increasing the weight the next cycle?...)

          (I'll take a look at that thread for some answers... )

          -S
          The Book Has Arrived!
          The Book Has Arrived!

          Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a pristine, well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, used up, worn out, and shouting, "Holy #$&^%$^... What a ride!!!"


          www.TrueNutrition.com

          2012 NPC Master's Nationals HW 5th. Mid-USA HW & Overall
          2010 NPC Jr. USA HW 4th, Pacific USA Heavy 2nd
          2009 NPC Mr. Arizona HW & Overall, Jr. Nationals HW 16th, Smoked at USA's

          Comment


          • #6
            That's exactly what my problem with this method would be as well. It seems like you could sell yourself short by just constantly pushing the reps a little further but not actually upping the weight.
            Disclaimer: I am not a DC trainee/expert/guru/coach, anything I say is purely my opinion based on experience and research I've read

            Comment


            • #7
              Is it just me, or does this just sound like someone making something incredibly simple into something incredibly complicated?

              Some things are complicated in life. Mediating disputes between the Israelis and Palestinians is complicated.

              Some things are simple in life. Lifting progressively heavier weights and eating enough is simple.

              Why do people want to make simple things more complicated?
              Ph.D., Theoretical Physics '16
              kind of a douche

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Sammich View Post
                Is it just me, or does this just sound like someone making something incredibly simple into something incredibly complicated?

                Some things are complicated in life. Mediating disputes between the Israelis and Palestinians is complicated.

                Some things are simple in life. Lifting progressively heavier weights and eating enough is simple.

                Why do people want to make simple things more complicated?
                OFF TOPIC Then why can't you diet down? OFF TOPIC

                :peep:
                For Training Inquiries go see the HNIC [email protected] anything else is uncivilized

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by DCBliever View Post
                  OFF TOPIC Then why can't you diet down? OFF TOPIC

                  :peep:
                  What does that have to do with anything?
                  Ph.D., Theoretical Physics '16
                  kind of a douche

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dcbliever View Post
                    off topic then why can't you diet down? Off topic

                    :peep:
                    Originally posted by sammich View Post
                    what does that have to do with anything?
                    me like fooood
                    Owner of 316FIT and Team Skip Approved Trainer


                    Instagram: @jaredragsdale
                    FB: www.fb.com/jared.ragsdale
                    www.316fit.com
                    Email: [email protected]

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Sammich View Post
                      What does that have to do with anything?
                      you say why do people have to make things complicated? so why can't you diet down, it's not complicated yet you seem to fail at it? I'm busting your balls
                      For Training Inquiries go see the HNIC [email protected] anything else is uncivilized

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DCBliever View Post
                        you say why do people have to make things complicated? so why can't you diet down, it's not complicated yet you seem to fail at it? I'm busting your balls
                        Maybe because I know how but I don't execute because of personal reasons? I don't pretend to make dieting any more complicated than it is. And maybe, just maybe, bringing up personal issues in this thread is a bad idea.
                        Ph.D., Theoretical Physics '16
                        kind of a douche

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Sammich View Post
                          Is it just me, or does this just sound like someone making something incredibly simple into something incredibly complicated?

                          Some things are complicated in life. Mediating disputes between the Israelis and Palestinians is complicated.

                          Some things are simple in life. Lifting progressively heavier weights and eating enough is simple.

                          Why do people want to make simple things more complicated?
                          There are a lot of motivations for making something simple more complicated. In regards to the fitness industry it's usually to make money. People aren't attracted to "simple" -- they pay money for complicated and flashy. If you try to get achieve a goal and fail and someone tells you that it's "simple" -- you refuse to believe it. You worked out hard for 2 weeks and you're not where you want to be (with your unrealistic expectations) so it HAS to be complicated. It has to be something you're NOT doing.

                          'Simple' is also relative. As you progress as a lifter/bodybuilder, so should your diet and training. Someone squatting 135 and just starting out probably doesn't need to worry so much about pre/peri/post workout nutrition or training cycles, supercompensation, accumulated fatigue etc. but someone who's closer to their genetic potential squatting 600, 700 or 800+ pounds will definitely need to think about this stuff because that's what it takes. In this sense things get more "complicated" but relatively speaking it'll stay simple compared to quantum physics or being married.

                          It's easy to say "why are you trying to make something so simple so complicated" and this has some validity, but at the same time, some people are just interested and as long as you're not being OCD/analysis paralysis, you're allowed to be intellectually curious. You're also allowed/encouraged to question what you're doing not in the sense that "oh wtf my program probably sucks" but "oh I'm doing this because.... and I'm doing this because..."
                          True Protein Discount Code: AWC155

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Sammich View Post
                            Is it just me, or does this just sound like someone making something incredibly simple into something incredibly complicated?

                            Some things are complicated in life. Mediating disputes between the Israelis and Palestinians is complicated.

                            Some things are simple in life. Lifting progressively heavier weights and eating enough is simple.

                            Why do people want to make simple things more complicated?
                            Yes....
                            International Elite Raw Powerlifter
                            Blood - Sweat - Chalk

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by AChoi View Post
                              There are a lot of motivations for making something simple more complicated. In regards to the fitness industry it's usually to make money. People aren't attracted to "simple" -- they pay money for complicated and flashy. If you try to get achieve a goal and fail and someone tells you that it's "simple" -- you refuse to believe it. You worked out hard for 2 weeks and you're not where you want to be (with your unrealistic expectations) so it HAS to be complicated. It has to be something you're NOT doing.

                              'Simple' is also relative. As you progress as a lifter/bodybuilder, so should your diet and training. Someone squatting 135 and just starting out probably doesn't need to worry so much about pre/peri/post workout nutrition or training cycles, supercompensation, accumulated fatigue etc. but someone who's closer to their genetic potential squatting 600, 700 or 800+ pounds will definitely need to think about this stuff because that's what it takes. In this sense things get more "complicated" but relatively speaking it'll stay simple compared to quantum physics or being married.

                              It's easy to say "why are you trying to make something so simple so complicated" and this has some validity, but at the same time, some people are just interested and as long as you're not being OCD/analysis paralysis, you're allowed to be intellectually curious. You're also allowed/encouraged to question what you're doing not in the sense that "oh wtf my program probably sucks" but "oh I'm doing this because.... and I'm doing this because..."
                              I agree with your points, with the following addenda:

                              1) If this is a flashy new thing for the author to make money off of, then fuck 'em for being a douchebag.

                              2) If this is a ripoff of rest-pausing (which it seems to be), then fuck 'em for being a thief.

                              3) I agree with advanced people needing new things to keep progressing, but how many advanced strength athletes do you think will be looking into MYOREPS®? My guess is approximately 1. The vast majority of people jumping on this will be the kids (relatively speaking) looking for the biggest and best thing, who are exactly the people I was more or less speaking to in my post. They're the ones who need to KISS: progressively heavier weights and eating plenty.

                              4) The people with exercise/nutrition obsession are also the ones I was referring to in my post. They are also usually the people who would benefit the most from KISS.
                              Ph.D., Theoretical Physics '16
                              kind of a douche

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X