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  • Overtraining in Bodybuilding overated??

    Do you think people worry too much about overtraining in bodybuilding?

    It seems like bodybuilding is the only sport where people worry about working too hard.

    What are your guys thoughts on this?

  • #2
    It's not about working too hard, its about working too hard for too long. bodybuilding= more muscle. more muscle = tear down rebuild. the faster you can tear down, the more time you spend rebuilding = the more you can tear down = the more muscle you build.

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    • #3
      If you're intermediate to advanced, overtraining is a very real concern. If you're a beginner and still picking up proper form/motor patterns, then overtraining is less of a concern.

      Is it made out to be bigger a deal than it is? Not really... it's definitely something you should consider but only after you consider the all important question of, "Am I a pussy?"

      I don't think there ever is a concern with working too hard in bodybuilding. Very few people can hang with the intensity/endure the training fatigue that is required to succeed in the sport... but I'd argue that even fewer can hang at the dinner table...day in and day out. Cranking out an intense set of squats is cool and bad ass for sure, but eating the way you're supposed to (not exactly fun) for month after month and year after year is much less glamorous and in my opinion... much, much harder.
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      • #4
        I think it depends a lot on the poundages you lift and your personal recovery abilities.

        If you go to failure every single session, you will need more recovery...

        If you train one day, and you feel great the next and you want to workout again, just go for it. If you feel let down, then don't.

        Your body will tell you whether you have recovered or not...
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        • #5
          Originally posted by jvandemo View Post
          I think it depends a lot on the poundages you lift and your personal recovery abilities.

          If you go to failure every single session, you will need more recovery...

          If you train one day, and you feel great the next and you want to workout again, just go for it. If you feel let down, then don't.

          Your body will tell you whether you have recovered or not...
          That's a really good point, which reminded me of one outstanding tip from the Q & A with Dusty Hanshaw thread. Dusty, in response to a question from Lock it Up, wrote that more rest was one of the most important things that had helped him overcome plateaus.

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          • #6
            I think CNS recovery is neglected by some. Most people train with some sort of bodypart split and think that working different muscles on different days makes it ok, but I think the CNS needs at least 48 hours to recover. I used to train on a straight 4 for the longest time and ignored my body when it was clearly telling me I was exhausted. I still made progress, though not for long enough periods of time and I always felt beat up. When I changed to a 3 day, non-consecutive split, I noticed a huge difference in performance and I felt much better. To make sure, I tried doing the 3 days consecutively to gauge how I felt, and I felt beat up again. The extra emphasis on recovery between sessions did in fact make all the difference. I'm even considering trying to condense my training into a 2 day split, Monday and Thursday, as they would only be about 80 minute sessions and I'd have even more time to recover.

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            • #7
              Frank brings up a great point. The CNS takes much longer to recover and is harder to gauge as to whether it has recovered or not. Muscles recover faster and are easier to tell if they have done so vs. the CNS. I think this becomes more true the more advanced you are as well.

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              • #8
                It is a concern for anybody who has been training for any decent amount of time. And it is most definitely an issue for any advanced athlete, and is a concern for anybody who trains hard a lot. This is the reason for example that football teams back off the intensity considerably once they are in season.
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                • #9
                  People like to throw around CNS a lot these days... anyone have any papers from a peer reviewed journal talking about CNS recovery, burn out, etc? Personally I think people are mistaking CNS burnout for simply classic overtraining/reaching, maybe adrenals...
                  Last edited by RedSkull; 05-27-2011, 09:02 AM.
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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RedSkull View Post
                    People like to throw around CNS a lot these days... anyone have any papers from a peer reviewed journal talking about CNS recovery, burn out, etc? Personally I think people are mistaking CNS burnout for simply classic overtraining/reaching, maybe adrenals...
                    Maybe I don't know what I'm talking about, it's very likely. I just noticed more consistent progression and not feeling like shit when my training sessions are non-consecutive.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by FRANK_KOVACIC View Post
                      Maybe I don't know what I'm talking about, it's very likely. I just noticed more consistent progression and not feeling like shit when my training sessions are non-consecutive.
                      Me too, I definitely agree with that. I wasn't aiming the CNS comment at you either, just seems popular that every time someone overtrains over the last few years it's the CNS that's to blame.

                      PJR who used to post here wrote something about it here:
                      http://www.lift-run-bang.com/2010/04/cns-burnout.html
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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RedSkull View Post
                        People like to throw around CNS a lot these days... anyone have any papers from a peer reviewed journal talking about CNS recovery, burn out, etc? Personally I think people are mistaking CNS burnout for simply classic overtraining/reaching, maybe adrenals...
                        Good point. I have never seen a peer-reviewed journal on CNS burnout etc. I am not saying it does not happen by any means, but I agree with your statement. I think they are too many variables from individual to individual to accurately gauge the affect of weight training on the CNS which is why there are no peer-reviewed articles (or if there are, I have been unable to locate them). Actually, I would like to see some research on PNS fatigue as opposed to, or compared with, CNS...

                        I am sure Homon would have more information on this, and it would be great if he finds his way into this thread.

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                        • #13
                          Is overtraining real? Yes.
                          Do I think a lot of people use it as an excuse for training like a pussy? Yes.

                          I'd venture to say many more people don't make progress or hit a plateau because of their eating habbits and not because of overtraining.
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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JasonWojo View Post
                            Is overtraining real? Yes.
                            Do I think a lot of people use it as an excuse for training like a pussy? Yes.

                            I'd venture to say many more people don't make progress or hit a plateau because of their eating habbits and not because of overtraining.
                            End of thread. Love this response.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by RedSkull View Post
                              People like to throw around CNS a lot these days... anyone have any papers from a peer reviewed journal talking about CNS recovery, burn out, etc? Personally I think people are mistaking CNS burnout for simply classic overtraining/reaching, maybe adrenals...
                              Perhaps homon can jump in with some journals... but it is my understanding from my undergrad that classic overtraining/reaching is another way of saying you've over trained your CNS (and or PNS)... this can lead to hormonal issues as well...
                              -2013 USAPL Michigan State Championships 198lb Raw Mens Open, 1st Place (1217 total)
                              -2013 USAPL Texas State Championships
                              198 Raw Mens Open, 2nd place (1216 total)
                              -2012 USAPL Longhorn Open
                              198 Raw Mens Open, 1st place (1177 total)
                              -2012 USAPL Aggie Showdown
                              198lb Raw Mens Open, 2nd place (1137 total)

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