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Incline Bench Form..

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  • Incline Bench Form..

    Everyone knows that good form on flat bench can boost one's bench by a large margin AND reduce the chance of injury. Arched back, shoulder blades pinched together, tucking with the elbows, leg drive, etc.

    Recently, I have been using incline bench as my main chest exercise to try to stimulate more chest growth. I have been keeping my upper back tight but I find the movement kind of awkward. I am not quite sure where the bar path should be. Should it be closer to my clavicle? Or lower down? I find when its near my clavicle, it feels closer to a shoulder press...but the lift itself feels more stable. I find that when the bar is closer to my chest, it targets the chest better, but feels more unstable as I go up...

    My max incline is roughly 90 pounds less than my max bench. So it needs work!

  • #2
    Yes mchicia1 you are quite right and i know about this exercise, that it reduce the chance of injury and is very beneficial and better for chest growth.
    chicago boot camp

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    • #3
      http://southernlord.efblogs.com/2009...by-bill-starr/

      Bill Starr himself describes what I consider to be good form on an incline bench in this article. Have a look.
      Disclaimer: I am not a DC trainee/expert/guru/coach, anything I say is purely my opinion based on experience and research I've read

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Carlito Gambino View Post
        http://southernlord.efblogs.com/2009...by-bill-starr/

        Bill Starr himself describes what I consider to be good form on an incline bench in this article. Have a look.
        Thanks for the article, that helped a lot. So no wonder I felt more comfortable bringing the bar closer to my neck...that is exactly what he recommends. And he said if you bring it down to your chest, it will drift forward and become unstable...exactly what I experienced. He also is saying dont tuck...I was tucking big time. No wonder I have been struggling with it.

        Thanks dude.
        Last edited by SkinnyMike42; 05-04-2011, 10:21 AM.

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        • #5
          No problem, man. I see a lot of guys that struggle with incline benching and seem to think it has to be similar to regular or decline benching (as in, bar to chest), when it's in fact a lot simpler than that. As long as you're keeping a straight line you'll be fine.
          Disclaimer: I am not a DC trainee/expert/guru/coach, anything I say is purely my opinion based on experience and research I've read

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          • #6
            good

            good post

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            • #7
              Do you guys prefer to use the incline bench stations or do you try to set it up in the squat rack for the safety pins? I am using my wife to spot, but the weight is getting fairly heavy and it seems like its harder for her to lift the weight up vs when I am doing it on flat. Any disadvantages with setting up an adjustable bench inside the squat rack instead? If not, I will just do that.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by mchicia1 View Post
                Do you guys prefer to use the incline bench stations or do you try to set it up in the squat rack for the safety pins? I am using my wife to spot, but the weight is getting fairly heavy and it seems like its harder for her to lift the weight up vs when I am doing it on flat. Any disadvantages with setting up an adjustable bench inside the squat rack instead? If not, I will just do that.
                is she elevated at the stations? have her stand on a box etc if not
                Overtraining should be one of the lowest concerns. You should focus on optimal training.
                -John Ceasar

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