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  • Caffeine and protein absorption

    I heard the other day, from a well respected local guy, that caffeine should not be taken with a protein meal because it gets in the way of absorption.

    Now, I have to admit, if this is common knowelege I am going to feel stupid here but I have NEVER heard that and I know some top protein manufacturers that put caffeine in their protein drinks (mocha flavors, etc..).

    Can anyone clear this up or point me in the general direction of some info that could validate this?

    Skip


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  • #2
    I've never heard of this either. I would be curious to see where it came from. I've heard the same about calcium and magnesium. But a Doc friend of mine disputes it..Once again, I would have to see the documentation.
    Heckman aka "WISE" OLD MAN

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    • #3
      This biologically just doesnt make sense tell that dude he is full of shiat....I will elaborate later client taking me out to dinner in a few though
      Short mod @ www.beyondmass.com

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      • #4
        Originally posted by midwtchamp
        This biologically just doesnt make sense tell that dude he is full of shiat....I will elaborate later client taking me out to dinner in a few though
        I won't tell him he is full of shit because he is well respected and he didn't come out and state it as fact as much as he said it in conversation. I didn't want to question him about it because I wondered if it was something that was so common that I didn't want to seem stupid by not knowing. lol

        I do get your point, though. It doesn't make any sense to me, either. I would wonder what the rationale is behind his opinion.

        Skip


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        • #5
          the only thing i can think of, i know caffeine from coffee and other foods, can greatly speed up the gastrointestinal tract, which in turn can effect absorption of not only protein but all the other macro nutrients.

          caffeine as well, has been know to block the absorption of other substances as well, like alcohol, calcium, etc. not only does it block absorption, in some cases it can speed up the metabolism of the substance to remove it from the body quicker.

          i have not really heard anything regarding specifically caffeine and protein absorption, but i will do a few searches on med-line and pubmed and see if any studies were done.

          tpc






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          • #6
            TPC,

            I believe it is not necessarily the caffeine in coffee that stimulates gastric acid production, but rather some other compound. (Can't recall what right now...)

            Couldn't find much in humans, but a study in rats (1. Dubick, M. A. and A. P. Majumdar. Biochemical changes in the exocrine pancreas of rats fed caffeine. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 191:153-158, 1989.) chronically fed caffeine at levels intended to match normal human consumption had reduced sensitivity of the cells of their pancreases that produces the proenzyme of protein breakdown. This would mean a reduction in *rate* of protein breakdown and absorption.

            This makes sense, given that caffeine (like eph., and clen) mimic the sympathetic nervous system, which generally inhibits digestions and absorption of nutrients.

            I don't know that the caffeine would reduce protein biological value (less absorbed), but it certainly makes sense to me that it would slow digestion and absorption.

            -Randy
            The Book Has Arrived!
            The Book Has Arrived!

            Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a pristine, well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, used up, worn out, and shouting, "Holy #$&^%$^... What a ride!!!"


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            • #7
              Originally posted by homonunculus
              I don't know that the caffeine would reduce protein biological value (less absorbed), but it certainly makes sense to me that it would slow digestion and absorption.
              But would it be significant enough to even matter? I mean, given a normal person's caffeine consumption (not a 3 pot coffee drinker)?

              I just don't see it being all that signficant.

              Skip


              Facebook: Skip Hill
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              For Training Inquiries: [email protected]

              Use discount code "SKIP" and get your TEAM SKIP protein here: www.TrueNutrition.com/TEAMSKIPblend

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              • #8
                Bump for more discussion.
                What did the 5 fingers say to the face?

                Slap b*tch!!

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                • #9
                  If my coffee is bad for me just shoot me now-
                  Livin' for the pump

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rippedchef
                    If my coffee is bad for me just shoot me now-
                    Can we just shoot you anyway? :2guns:
                    Short mod @ www.beyondmass.com

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Skip
                      But would it be significant enough to even matter? I mean, given a normal person's caffeine consumption (not a 3 pot coffee drinker)?

                      I just don't see it being all that signficant.

                      Skip
                      Me neither, except for people who tend to get upset stomachs from high protein intake. Even if absorption is just down a couple percent, the entry of that food matter into the large intestine could create a field day for the bacteria there. LOTS o' gas.

                      This may be the experience that your friend's noticed over the years - increased gastrointestinal misery in dieting BBer's after they've jacked up the caffeine in their pre-contest arsenal... May be the case for him, as well (which solidifies his opinion).

                      -Randy
                      The Book Has Arrived!
                      The Book Has Arrived!

                      Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a pristine, well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, used up, worn out, and shouting, "Holy #$&^%$^... What a ride!!!"


                      www.TrueNutrition.com

                      2012 NPC Master's Nationals HW 5th. Mid-USA HW & Overall
                      2010 NPC Jr. USA HW 4th, Pacific USA Heavy 2nd
                      2009 NPC Mr. Arizona HW & Overall, Jr. Nationals HW 16th, Smoked at USA's

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by homonunculus
                        Me neither, except for people who tend to get upset stomachs from high protein intake. Even if absorption is just down a couple percent, the entry of that food matter into the large intestine could create a field day for the bacteria there. LOTS o' gas.

                        This may be the experience that your friend's noticed over the years - increased gastrointestinal misery in dieting BBer's after they've jacked up the caffeine in their pre-contest arsenal... May be the case for him, as well (which solidifies his opinion).

                        -Randy
                        Now, THAT I can live with.

                        Rippedchef - I am with you, bro. I need my a.m. coffee with breakfast, prior to training.

                        Skip


                        Facebook: Skip Hill
                        Instagram: @intensemuscle
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                        For Training Inquiries: [email protected]

                        Use discount code "SKIP" and get your TEAM SKIP protein here: www.TrueNutrition.com/TEAMSKIPblend

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Skip
                          But would it be significant enough to even matter? I mean, given a normal person's caffeine consumption (not a 3 pot coffee drinker)?

                          I just don't see it being all that signficant.

                          Skip
                          one thing i learned over the years looking at studies is you always have to look at both sides, one being clinical and technical and the other being a "real life" situation. there may be some obscure study somewhere stating caffeine does inhibit absorption of protein, but in real life it may be so minute it really doesn't matter.

                          as well the benefits of caffeine, green tea, coffee, etc by far, out weigh if your body absorbs 50 grams of protein over 51 grams of protein if you didn't use caffeine. hopefully this made sence.

                          from looking at some of the studies semi related to this, there is some truth to the statement, but nothing that really matters in "real life".

                          tpc
                          TRUEPROTEIN.COM

                          THE HIGHEST QUALITY SUPPLEMENTS AT THE ABSOLUTE LOWEST PRICE...

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                          • #14
                            Caffeine increases insulin resistance not sensitivity.

                            A pleasing blend
                            By mixing exercise with caffeine, you decrease your risk of insulin
                            resistance
                            by Sarah Haines
                            morning coffee may jump start your day, but it may also increase your
                            susceptibility to diabetes, say U of G and Queen's University researchers.
                            Felicia Greer, a PhD candidate in Guelph's Department of Human Biology and
                            Nutritional Sciences; Bob Ross, an associate professor in the Faculty of
                            Health Sciences at Queen's University; and Bob Hudson, an endocrinologist at
                            Queen's, have found that a high intake of caffeine can increase insulin
                            resistance.
                            This phenomenon is related to a low uptake of glucose in the cells. Insulin
                            is a hormone that helps cells take up glucose in the blood. People who are
                            insulin-resistant are more susceptible to diabetes, high blood pressure and
                            cardiovascular disease.
                            "The impact of insulin resistance will be more serious for some people than
                            others," says Greer. "It will depend on their age, lifestyle and level of
                            fitness."
                            The insulin-resistant study involved eight healthy but sedentary males
                            between the ages of 24 and 30. During the trials, the participants received
                            either a placebo or a pure caffeine pill (the equivalent of two or three
                            cups of strong coffee) after withdrawing from caffeine consumption for 48
                            hours. Their insulin resistance was measured after each pill was consumed.
                            The researchers found that after participants ingested caffeine, their
                            ability to take up glucose was reduced by 20 to 25 per cent, which
                            translates into increased insulin resistance. In contrast, the placebo had
                            no effect on glucose take-up.
                            Last edited by KJB77; 05-01-2004, 10:20 AM.

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                            • #15
                              Actually the American Diabetes Assoc. says that people that drink 3-5 cups of coffee per day have a 50% less chance of developing diabetes than non coffee drinkers. They say this is from improved insulin sensitivity.
                              If the caffiene creates insulin resisitance then it is certainly the magnesium that buffs that and creates the improved insulin sensitivity.....ADA says it expects it is in fact the magnesium doing the magic.

                              One highly respected MD also says that 1 cup of coffee has the antioxidant protection of 3 oranges.

                              Time for me to start up on coffee too I suppose....
                              [email protected] http://www.proactivehealthnet.com

                              " We know that to err is human, but the HIV/AIDS hypothesis is one hell of a mistake"
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                              "The fact is that you can not start off with bad science and end up with good medicine"

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