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  • #16
    I worked swing shift for 15 years and just never really knew how poor my sleep was because I was always switching back and forth between days and nights. I finally had a sleep study ( and it was still at night skip, even though I slept during the day), and was prescribed a cpap. I still wake up often during sleep, but I have become so dependent on it to sleep, that I don’t even try to nap without it.

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    • #17
      It doesn’t seem like you have the symptoms of apnea. I have it. Bad. I’ve used a cpap for years, and if I don’t, I feel like I am hungover. Absolutely terrible. I think you’re fine.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Sjohnson View Post
        It doesn’t seem like you have the symptoms of apnea. I have it. Bad. I’ve used a cpap for years, and if I don’t, I feel like I am hungover. Absolutely terrible. I think you’re fine.
        I don't think so, either.

        Skip


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        • #19
          Personally, I don’t think you should worry it. You would most definitely be experiencing some sort of symptoms like headaches, lethargic through the day, no energy, etc. if it was an actual sleep apnea. Do you snore? Or does Melissa notice if you stop breathing ever?

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          • #20
            Originally posted by sweetjane57 View Post
            Personally, I don’t think you should worry it. You would most definitely be experiencing some sort of symptoms like headaches, lethargic through the day, no energy, etc. if it was an actual sleep apnea. Do you snore? Or does Melissa notice if you stop breathing ever?
            Nope and nope. I take that back; I do snore if I am freakin' exhausted but that's it. The only time I ever stop breathing while sleeping is when she puts a pillow over my face and tries to snuff me out. I'm wise to her, though. It ain't working.

            Skip


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            • #21
              https://blog.fitbit.com/sleep-study/

              "The average Fitbit user is in bed for 7 hours and 33 minutes but only gets 6 hours and 38 minutes of sleep. The remaining 55 minutes is spent restless or awake. That may seem like a lot, but it’s actually pretty common."

              -------

              http://sleepeducation.org/essentials...s-risk-factors

              "Common symptoms of sleep apnea include:
              • Loud or frequent snoring
              • Silent pauses in breathing
              • Choking or gasping sounds
              • Daytime sleepiness or fatigue
              • Unrefreshing sleep
              • Insomnia
              • Morning headaches
              • Nocturia (waking during the night to go to the bathroom)
              • Difficulty concentrating
              • Memory loss
              • Decreased sexual desire
              • Irritability"

              Ken,

              Having a high BMI (which doesn't mean obesity in your case of course), being male, and having large neck are risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea, but I'm not getting the sense you have any signs or symptom of sleep apnea (central or obstructive)...

              I'd not be concerned about that fitbit "awake" time. Consider the 3-4 times up to pee and normal "wakefulness" (and that the fitbit isn't a clinical grade polysomnographic device), I'd say you're doing pretty damn well.

              -S
              The Book Has Arrived!
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              • #22
                Originally posted by homonunculus View Post
                https://blog.fitbit.com/sleep-study/

                "The average Fitbit user is in bed for 7 hours and 33 minutes but only gets 6 hours and 38 minutes of sleep. The remaining 55 minutes is spent restless or awake. That may seem like a lot, but it’s actually pretty common."

                -------

                http://sleepeducation.org/essentials...s-risk-factors

                "Common symptoms of sleep apnea include:
                • Loud or frequent snoring
                • Silent pauses in breathing
                • Choking or gasping sounds
                • Daytime sleepiness or fatigue
                • Unrefreshing sleep
                • Insomnia
                • Morning headaches
                • Nocturia (waking during the night to go to the bathroom)
                • Difficulty concentrating
                • Memory loss
                • Decreased sexual desire
                • Irritability"

                Ken,

                Having a high BMI (which doesn't mean obesity in your case of course), being male, and having large neck are risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea, but I'm not getting the sense you have any signs or symptom of sleep apnea (central or obstructive)...

                I'd not be concerned about that fitbit "awake" time. Consider the 3-4 times up to pee and normal "wakefulness" (and that the fitbit isn't a clinical grade polysomnographic device), I'd say you're doing pretty damn well.

                -S
                I think this is what I have come to, as well.

                I looked into the awake-time more and I am actually slightly below average in that sense.

                Thanks for the feedback, though, as I feel better that you agree that you don't think it is an apnea issue, either.


                Skip


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                • #23
                  Getting a sleep study is definetly worth it. I noticed a big change once i started using mine. Ive tried sleeping without it and every time i wake up afterwards i have a dry mouth, feel dizzy(like i havent had enough oxygen) and brainfog.

                  Regarding nocturia, Does anyone have any remedies for frequent peeing at night? tired of waking up 4x a night lol
                  Last edited by mugmeh; 03-25-2020, 03:01 PM.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by mugmeh View Post
                    Getting a sleep study is definetly worth it. I noticed a big change once i started using mine. Ive tried sleeping without it and every time i wake up afterwards i have a dry mouth, feel dizzy(like i havent had enough oxygen) and brainfog.

                    Regarding nocturia, Does anyone have any remedies for frequent peeing at night? tired of waking up 4x a night lol
                    I have most of my clients cut their water intake down dramatically within the last 3 hours of going to sleep.

                    Skip


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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Ken "Skip" Hill View Post

                      I have most of my clients cut their water intake down dramatically within the last 3 hours of going to sleep.

                      Skip
                      I usually cut my water at 7-8pm and go to bed at midnight and i still experience the same thing.

                      I dont have any prostate issues and no STD's and this has been consistent for over 5 years no.

                      I tried drinking less for a week, going from 4-6l a day to 2.5-3.5l a day but i experienced the same thing and i actually got dehydrated and noticed performance in the gym even suffered from it. After i started drinking my normal amounts again, i noticed my performance came back and my muscle fullness was back to normal.

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                      • #26
                        It is possible that you simply produce less vasopressin (ADH) than most other people (diabetes insipidus). I am not familiar with a way to increase vasopressin other than using a drug called desmopressin late in the evening before bed. I believe it comes in a nasal spray.

                        Skip

                        Originally posted by mugmeh View Post

                        I usually cut my water at 7-8pm and go to bed at midnight and i still experience the same thing.

                        I dont have any prostate issues and no STD's and this has been consistent for over 5 years no.

                        I tried drinking less for a week, going from 4-6l a day to 2.5-3.5l a day but i experienced the same thing and i actually got dehydrated and noticed performance in the gym even suffered from it. After i started drinking my normal amounts again, i noticed my performance came back and my muscle fullness was back to normal.


                        Facebook: Skip Hill
                        Instagram: @intensemuscle
                        YouTube: TEAMSKIP
                        TikTok: @intensemuscle


                        For Training Inquiries: [email protected]

                        Use discount code "SKIP" and get your TEAM SKIP protein here: www.TrueNutrition.com/TEAMSKIPblend

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                        • #27
                          “ I get up a lot to pee -- probably 3 or 4 times per night -- but I have no problem going back to sleep almost instantly.”

                          Skip, that was me the last couple years. I always excused it to the amount of water I drank, 1&1/2 to 2 gallons of water a day, going to pee a lot! At 6’5” and weight when fat 310 down to 260 I wasn’t worried about it, until 2019. 2019 my weight crept up to 350. My eating habits are pretty routine. Not as junky as you would think going by the weight numbers. Eating frequency when busy is 4 times a day and the rest is 5-6 times a day. Calorie deficit and was still slowly gaining weight. Surely turning 49 can’t have that big of an impact.

                          My Dr. who is the same age and height and does several Ironman/triathlon’s a year said “you have sleep apnea,... and I know this because I do to.” One of the signs of a sleep apnea is frequent urination during the night, anything more than twice is an issue. A REM cycle for everybody is a hour and a half, so getting 1.5, 3, 4.5 & 6 hours will always feel more refreshing than 8 hours of sleep. Optimal being 7.5 to 9. I was excited to get 6 hours. Go to bed, sleep 1.5 to 3 hrs, pee, go right back to sleep, 1.5 hours later pee, repeat.

                          Did sleep study at home, finally got CPap the beginning of Feb this year. What a difference! I sleep anywhere from 6 to 7.5 hours straight, no getting up to pee. Even on nights I sleep 9 or more hours, maybe once to urinate.
                          I never woke up choking, out of breath. Wife has never observed me not breathing, yet I logged 47.5 apnea’s an hour ( more than 10 seconds without a breath). I also haven’t had a single issue of profuse sweating at night like previously. I thought that was from food reactions, turns out it’s also a sign of sleep apnea, body will overheat if it’s not getting O2.

                          Hope this is of use for you Skip and everybody else.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Magnus-1 View Post
                            “ I get up a lot to pee -- probably 3 or 4 times per night -- but I have no problem going back to sleep almost instantly.”

                            Skip, that was me the last couple years. I always excused it to the amount of water I drank, 1&1/2 to 2 gallons of water a day, going to pee a lot! At 6’5” and weight when fat 310 down to 260 I wasn’t worried about it, until 2019. 2019 my weight crept up to 350. My eating habits are pretty routine. Not as junky as you would think going by the weight numbers. Eating frequency when busy is 4 times a day and the rest is 5-6 times a day. Calorie deficit and was still slowly gaining weight. Surely turning 49 can’t have that big of an impact.

                            My Dr. who is the same age and height and does several Ironman/triathlon’s a year said “you have sleep apnea,... and I know this because I do to.” One of the signs of a sleep apnea is frequent urination during the night, anything more than twice is an issue. A REM cycle for everybody is a hour and a half, so getting 1.5, 3, 4.5 & 6 hours will always feel more refreshing than 8 hours of sleep. Optimal being 7.5 to 9. I was excited to get 6 hours. Go to bed, sleep 1.5 to 3 hrs, pee, go right back to sleep, 1.5 hours later pee, repeat.

                            Did sleep study at home, finally got CPap the beginning of Feb this year. What a difference! I sleep anywhere from 6 to 7.5 hours straight, no getting up to pee. Even on nights I sleep 9 or more hours, maybe once to urinate.
                            I never woke up choking, out of breath. Wife has never observed me not breathing, yet I logged 47.5 apnea’s an hour ( more than 10 seconds without a breath). I also haven’t had a single issue of profuse sweating at night like previously. I thought that was from food reactions, turns out it’s also a sign of sleep apnea, body will overheat if it’s not getting O2.

                            Hope this is of use for you Skip and everybody else.
                            my AHI was 25, i started sleeping with the CPAP in january and i still wake up to pee 3-4x a night. I have had maybe 1 or 2 times where i could sleep 3 hours at once.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Magnus-1 View Post
                              “ I get up a lot to pee -- probably 3 or 4 times per night -- but I have no problem going back to sleep almost instantly.”

                              Skip, that was me the last couple years. I always excused it to the amount of water I drank, 1&1/2 to 2 gallons of water a day, going to pee a lot! At 6’5” and weight when fat 310 down to 260 I wasn’t worried about it, until 2019. 2019 my weight crept up to 350. My eating habits are pretty routine. Not as junky as you would think going by the weight numbers. Eating frequency when busy is 4 times a day and the rest is 5-6 times a day. Calorie deficit and was still slowly gaining weight. Surely turning 49 can’t have that big of an impact.

                              My Dr. who is the same age and height and does several Ironman/triathlon’s a year said “you have sleep apnea,... and I know this because I do to.” One of the signs of a sleep apnea is frequent urination during the night, anything more than twice is an issue. A REM cycle for everybody is a hour and a half, so getting 1.5, 3, 4.5 & 6 hours will always feel more refreshing than 8 hours of sleep. Optimal being 7.5 to 9. I was excited to get 6 hours. Go to bed, sleep 1.5 to 3 hrs, pee, go right back to sleep, 1.5 hours later pee, repeat.

                              Did sleep study at home, finally got CPap the beginning of Feb this year. What a difference! I sleep anywhere from 6 to 7.5 hours straight, no getting up to pee. Even on nights I sleep 9 or more hours, maybe once to urinate.
                              I never woke up choking, out of breath. Wife has never observed me not breathing, yet I logged 47.5 apnea’s an hour ( more than 10 seconds without a breath). I also haven’t had a single issue of profuse sweating at night like previously. I thought that was from food reactions, turns out it’s also a sign of sleep apnea, body will overheat if it’s not getting O2.

                              Hope this is of use for you Skip and everybody else.
                              Thank you.

                              I have zero symptoms of sleep apnea, though. Peeing at night is not always related to apnea, it can simply be that you have to pee. lol

                              I am well-rested during the day, performance is not an issue, getting lean and growing isn't an issue, etc. My only concern was that I had a total of about 1 hour of awake time for about 8 hours of sleep but found with more research that this is actually below average. My REM and deep sleep patterns are all normal, as well.


                              Skip


                              Facebook: Skip Hill
                              Instagram: @intensemuscle
                              YouTube: TEAMSKIP
                              TikTok: @intensemuscle


                              For Training Inquiries: [email protected]

                              Use discount code "SKIP" and get your TEAM SKIP protein here: www.TrueNutrition.com/TEAMSKIPblend

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