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  • Intense Training

    Intensity is simply generating the most amount of stress on a body part or muscle in the shortest period of time. Intensity is best understood by explaining its effects on muscle and its relation to muscle growth. Weight training serves as a means to an end. It merely places stress on the muscle being trained. When abnormal stress is placed on a muscle it has no choice but to respond in growth and size – this leads to GREATER muscle mass growth, which often translates to more fat loss and better tone with an increase in metabolic rate. Intensity is the amount of stress placed on a muscle. Unless the muscle is stressed beyond its current capacity, it has no reason to grow or change. Fact is the body hates change and will change only if the stress is too much. The body is homeostatic in nature. It has to stay the same – in temperatures, muscle size, etc – this is often in relation to its environment. Point is the body wants to stay the same. The body maintains a consistent temperature, normal enzyme level and more importantly it also maintains this consistency by limiting the amount of muscle it carries.

    For muscle growth or adaptation to occur, enough stress must be placed on the muscle so that it is literally damaged on a cellular level. Intensity is a mental thing in fact. When you curl a specific weight on the bicep curl, your brain sends a signal through the musculocutaneous nerve instructing the biceps brachia muscle to contract, and in line with homeostasis, it instructs only enough fibers to get the job done. This next part is amazing! Each fiber that moves does so at 100%, no more, no less. The only problem is it instructs only the necessary fibers to get the job done. That is why light weights and low intensity is a waste of time to build muscle size. Heavy high intensity training instructs all muscle fibers to work – to get the job done. It does not matter if you use machines or free weights, as long as the intensity is high, you will generate the required results. Lifting heavy weights will not do the job on its own. Lifting heavy weights with high intensity will do it! In theory, you could use light weights to get results but that would be impractical and extremely painful. The lactic acid build up would be too intense and rep ranges would be too significantly (70 – 100 reps).

    Most lifters are guilty of picking up a weight, doing a pre-determined set of repetitions and setting the weight down. That sort of training is no training at all – you are wasting your time and money at the gym. To capture the benefit (all or nothing philosophy) you have to lift to the point where completing another rep is physically impossible! And then beyond is the only way you grow and to do that you must have really developed mental powers because the pain often deludes you into believing that you have reached failure when you have not. When you train beyond failure the body has to grow to adapt to the stress. It has to as a self defense mechanism even though it does not want to do it. To prevent you from doing such damage to it, it uses lactic acid build up (physical) and mental obstruction to fool and force you or stop you. Your mind is the only tool you have to beat this “fooling mechanism”. Beat it and you have got a physique to be proud of in record time.
    TRAIN...because it's in your blood, EAT...because you need to feed the machine...and REST to grow for the next day of INTENSITY!

  • #2
    Re: Intense Training

    Originally posted by Centaur
    Intensity is simply generating the most amount of stress on a body part or muscle in the shortest period of time. Intensity is best understood by explaining its effects on muscle and its relation to muscle growth. Weight training serves as a means to an end. It merely places stress on the muscle being trained. When abnormal stress is placed on a muscle it has no choice but to respond in growth and size – this leads to GREATER muscle mass growth, which often translates to more fat loss and better tone with an increase in metabolic rate. Intensity is the amount of stress placed on a muscle. Unless the muscle is stressed beyond its current capacity, it has no reason to grow or change. Fact is the body hates change and will change only if the stress is too much. The body is homeostatic in nature. It has to stay the same – in temperatures, muscle size, etc – this is often in relation to its environment. Point is the body wants to stay the same. The body maintains a consistent temperature, normal enzyme level and more importantly it also maintains this consistency by limiting the amount of muscle it carries.

    For muscle growth or adaptation to occur, enough stress must be placed on the muscle so that it is literally damaged on a cellular level. Intensity is a mental thing in fact. When you curl a specific weight on the bicep curl, your brain sends a signal through the musculocutaneous nerve instructing the biceps brachia muscle to contract, and in line with homeostasis, it instructs only enough fibers to get the job done. This next part is amazing! Each fiber that moves does so at 100%, no more, no less. The only problem is it instructs only the necessary fibers to get the job done. That is why light weights and low intensity is a waste of time to build muscle size. Heavy high intensity training instructs all muscle fibers to work – to get the job done. It does not matter if you use machines or free weights, as long as the intensity is high, you will generate the required results. Lifting heavy weights will not do the job on its own. Lifting heavy weights with high intensity will do it! In theory, you could use light weights to get results but that would be impractical and extremely painful. The lactic acid build up would be too intense and rep ranges would be too significantly (70 – 100 reps).

    Most lifters are guilty of picking up a weight, doing a pre-determined set of repetitions and setting the weight down. That sort of training is no training at all – you are wasting your time and money at the gym. To capture the benefit (all or nothing philosophy) you have to lift to the point where completing another rep is physically impossible! And then beyond is the only way you grow and to do that you must have really developed mental powers because the pain often deludes you into believing that you have reached failure when you have not. When you train beyond failure the body has to grow to adapt to the stress. It has to as a self defense mechanism even though it does not want to do it. To prevent you from doing such damage to it, it uses lactic acid build up (physical) and mental obstruction to fool and force you or stop you. Your mind is the only tool you have to beat this “fooling mechanism”. Beat it and you have got a physique to be proud of in record time.
    great post
    Anyone can become angry - that is easy, but to be angry with the right
    person, to the right degree, at the right time, for the right purpose,
    and in the right way, that is not easy.
    -- Aristotle (384-322 B.C.)

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    • #3
      Very appropriate for "IntenseMuscle"!
      That will have to be our board creed.
      -KidRok-
      "...because I won't accept that I can't."


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      https://www.facebook.com/hopsfitnessxl

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      • #4
        My Take

        Well - I'm going to be bit of a "thorn in your butt"

        I don't believe in training to "failure." Just the semmantic of failing is counterproductive to our goals.

        "Intensity" is key. You can achieve intensity through MANY different methods. Always working to failure is only an injury waiting to happen. What's the "ultimate" failure? An injury is the ultimate failure. Pushing your muscle - and joints moreso than muscle! - is just asking for injury. I know - I've had way more than my share.

        One of the interesting topics that was a post over at my home board was related to "how" we perform exercises - "form." It was pointed out that when you watch many of the monsters train it appears that they are always doing partials. Monster amounts of weight but not "full range" of motion. Their emphasis is on "working" the muscle throughout the exercise, not the joints (keeping tension on the muscle). Are they "cheating?" I say that you could argue that "full range" is cheating. At full contraction and full extension, the load is shifted from muscle onto joints.

        I know of WAY TOO MANY bb'ers that have torn/blown out their knees. EVERYONE of them I've queried about "why" this happened said it was from squatting too deep! Sure it "looks" impressive. And in lifting "competitions" you're required to do full range. I'm just discovering that it may be counterproductive to a bb'er's end goal.

        Just some food for thought if nothing else

        xcel
        Last edited by xcelbeyond; 02-26-2004, 05:55 PM.
        Lift Smarter, not more
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        • #5
          Everyone has a right to their own opinion...that's why we have this forum. Thanks for the reply xcelbeyond!
          TRAIN...because it's in your blood, EAT...because you need to feed the machine...and REST to grow for the next day of INTENSITY!

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