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  • Sample hockey program

    Hey jay I'm currently a junior a hockey player and was wondering could you post a sample in season workout for a hockey player and and anything else you could share. Thankyou

  • #2
    where do you play Junior A? You play a pretty aggressive schedule so the inseason training program is very different than the offseason one.

    In season training with our teams we tend to focus on brief but fairly intense training that addresses the whole athletic need.

    Training times run around 75 minutes and would include some of the following:

    Full Dynamic Warmup with Hip, Glute, and Hamstring Mobility Drills - 10 minutes

    Weights -
    More upper body focus here as the legs tend to take a beating in hockey.
    Choose 1-2 Single Leg Exercises (walking lunges or bulgarian split squats, Single Leg Romanian Deadlifts) as well as a groin exercise (adductor machine, cossack squats, etc)
    do 1-2 sets of 10-20 reps per exercise
    Choose 1-2 Chest or Shoulder Exercises (Alternating DB Press, Pushups, Plyo Pushups, etc)
    Choose 1-3 Back Exercises (cleans, chins, db rows, chest supp row, shrugs, etc)
    Throwing in some light triceps/biceps work is good here as well time permitting
    do 1-2 sets of 10-20 reps per exercise

    In-season weight training should be focused on injury prevention and staying strong and healthy - trying to make significant strength gains during a season is risky and unnecessary - keep the sets challenging but doable and the reps clean and explosive. Remember the goal is to be better on the ice, not be sore and laboring.
    Weights should take between 15-20 minutes total so the pace needs to be kept high with short rest times (30-90s)

    Speed Work and Plyos -
    Again, the legs are always under constant stress with all of the skating and body contact in hockey, so keep this brief and to the point.

    Plyos - choose low-level plyos like box jumps or squat jumps and do 3-5 sets of 3-5 jumps. do 1-2 exercises. Full rest between sets

    Sprints - Get a few sprint starts in up to about 50-60 feet - just work on explosiveness.

    Foot work drills like the L-drill, 4 corners drills, or ladder drills - 1-2 drills for 5-6 sets each.

    All of this work should take about 15-20mins

    Cardio -

    Do a hard bike ride with intervals for about 15-18minutes with a 2 min flush at the end (low tension, med-high speed)

    Core and Stretch - 15-20 minutes

    If you've done your previous offseason right you should have peak strength and conditioning and will hopefully ride that through the season in maintenance mode. I'd do a workout like that 1-2X per week depending on how much you're on the ice.

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    • #3
      can you go into alittle specifics on this?

      "Full Dynamic Warmup with Hip, Glute, and Hamstring Mobility Drills - 10 minutes"


      Currently do the agile8, but looking to do more. I sit at a desk 12 hours a day, so my hip flexors are always super tight

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      • #4
        Ok, Thankyou so much that was very helpful. I play in Philadelphia, PA and I'm waiting to hopefully get called up or play next season in the echl. I just have a few questions about what you wrote. Btw I don't know what the schedule is like for the players you train but I have three practices and 2 games a week usually so 5 days on ice.

        1-Would I do all that (weights,sprinting,cardio etc) in one day? Or would I spread it out?

        2-Do I only preform this on off days? Does anything take place on my on ice days?

        3-I know you already mentioned it, but when doing weights I shouldn't go all out like as if it was off season and you were trying to climb in weight correct? Again Thankyou very much

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        • #5
          Originally posted by steve302 View Post
          can you go into alittle specifics on this?

          "Full Dynamic Warmup with Hip, Glute, and Hamstring Mobility Drills - 10 minutes"


          Currently do the agile8, but looking to do more. I sit at a desk 12 hours a day, so my hip flexors are always super tight
          Hurdle work is great and quick (over, under, lateral) with many variations that can be done quickly. Warm up should include dynamic (active) stretching (lunge variations, saigon squats, spiderman walk, groiners, ironcrosses/scorpions, walking single leg rdl, skip variations, inchworms, and the list goes on and on). I also like to include 4-8 speed ladder drills or simple agility (forward/back or lateral stepping, front/back hops, lateral hops - all about 6-12 inches range of motion) during warmups to mix up movement drills w/ stretching.

          Additionally, any olympic variation should absolutely go first in any workout and it can be beneficial to pair them with plyometric work. I also wouldnt really classify them as back work, instead they should be approached as specific training for triple extension and for neural adaptations (as in muscle recruitment. Also, you'll want to include some sport specific accessory work (for hockey some possibilities include lateral push offs - really anything which will strengthen the abductors, and maybe some hip rotation and rot. cuff work).
          Last edited by brineal; 11-18-2011, 09:37 PM.
          M.S., B.S., B.A., CSCS, USAW

          "There is no substitute for strength, and no excuse for the lack of it"

          "Two pains in life: pain of hard work and pain of regret"

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          • #6
            Originally posted by brineal View Post
            Hurdle work is great and quick (over, under, lateral) with many variations that can be done quickly. Warm up should include dynamic (active) stretching (lunge variations, saigon squats, spiderman walk, groiners, ironcrosses/scorpions, walking single leg rdl, skip variations, inchworms, and the list goes on and on). I also like to include 4-8 speed ladder drills or simple agility (forward/back or lateral stepping, front/back hops, lateral hops - all about 6-12 inches range of motion) during warmups to mix up movement drills w/ stretching.

            Additionally, any olympic variation should absolutely go first in any workout and it can be beneficial to pair them with plyometric work. I also wouldnt really classify them as back work, instead they should be approached as specific training for triple extension and for neural adaptations (as in muscle recruitment. Also, you'll want to include some sport specific accessory work (for hockey some possibilities include lateral push offs - really anything which will strengthen the abductors, and maybe some hip rotation and rot. cuff work).
            thanks. just saw your reply to my post, appreciate the info

            Comment

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